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    Paul also stated 'In order to set expectations, one of these titles at the increased print run will be announced in 2020, and six more will be announced in 2021.'
    I would not expect this to drive demand on upcoming releases or on the value of prior releases. I think it will allow for more books to be available to purchase when a customer finds the Suntup website which is something Paul has mentioned in the past.

    Comment


      Originally posted by bookworm 1 View Post
      I like the idea of a few more copies available. I'm happy with the gift editions,however once in a while a book does come along that I now have a better opportunity to secure copy of. Wish this was going to start with the next one as I'm gonna have to be quick if it's Let The Right One In and it doesn't well out during the presales.
      You and me both on LET THE RIGHT ONE IN. Maybe we'll get lucky and Paul had bumped that one up due to anticipated demand prior to the company-wide initiative.

      Comment


        I’m very pleased to hear about this new policy and the increase in limitations. I’ve never seriously looked at the limited editions up to this point due to both budget and the fact they sell out so quickly. So now this peaks my interest and I’ll definitely take a closer look if there’s a book that checks all the boxes for me knowing that there’d be a better chance of snagging a copy.

        Comment


          I love this move by Suntup! More beautiful books is a good thing. Hopefully, it'll also translate into lower prices as well.

          *Edited to add: I just went back and saw Dan's post about increasing the print run not really affecting prices. Well, that's a bummer. I'd really like to see his prices come down a bit. To be fair, I think Paul has tried to do that since the exorbitant (imo) prices on HORNS & ROSEMARY'S BABY. Also to be fair to him- and according to him- those prices were so high because of the letterpress printing. To me, unfortunately, I honestly couldn't tell, and thus, the higher cost wasn't justified. The "Polymer Plate" method of 'letterpress" printing just doesn't produce the same tactile "bite" that true letterpress printing does, so if it's adding a "significant" cost to producing the books- I'd just as soon have them printed offset or digital like everyone else and shave that amount off the book price.
          Last edited by swintek; 07-02-2020, 05:25 PM.

          Comment


            Originally posted by swintek View Post
            To me, unfortunately, I honestly couldn't tell, and thus, the higher cost wasn't justified. The "Polymer Plate" method of 'letterpress" printing just doesn't produce the same tactile "bite" that true letterpress printing does, so if it's adding a "significant" cost to producing the books- I'd just as soon have them printed offset or digital like everyone else and shave that amount off the book price.
            Hi Ron! I usually just keep my mouth shut when I read an inaccurate statement online about our books (and there are many), but I happened to see this and felt I should clear things up. Let's break this down:

            The "Polymer Plate" method of 'letterpress" printing just doesn't produce the same tactile "bite" that true letterpress printing does.

            Sorry Ron, but it does. It absolutely does. We choose not to make too deep an impression though. That is intentional. Any good letterpress printer will tell you that they don't like a deep impression in the paper. There are reasons for that, and I covered this in detail in a little pamphlet we created, and included with every copy of the Numbered I Am Legend. I don't think you have a copy, but if you run your fingers over the type at the top of the first page, you will feel the impression. That pamphlet was printed letterpress using photopolymer plates. I may actually post that article on the site so that more people can read it.

            So it is not the plates that determine the impression, it's a combination of factors, including the type of paper used, and the skill of the letterpress printer who determines the amount of impression. I should add that the alternative method you allude to which is handsetting a book in metal type is simply not an option. That would push the costs beyond what we could sell a book for, or what I would expect my customers to pay. Also, you refer to this process as not being "true" letterpress printing. It's letterpress. Period.

            Regarding this:

            ...so if it's adding a "significant" cost to producing the books- I'd just as soon have them printed offset or digital like everyone else and shave that amount off the book price.

            It's highly unlikely I will ever print our books digital. Not knocking that process, but it's just not an option for me for our books. But at the heart of this statement is cost. Letterpress printing adds a lot to the cost. There is no doubt about that, and there is validity to this part of your statement. Why print letterpress when we could sell books for lower prices if we printed offset. The letterpress experience goes beyond impression in paper though. There are other differences between an offset printed book, and one printed letterpress. But what you wrote is a very good point and makes a lot of sense.

            There are many factors that go into a decision as to whether to print an edition offset or letterpress. One of the most important is price. I think of our customers first. I think of the novel itself. The author or the author's Estate. And ultimately a decision is made. For me, printing The Lottery offset simply to come out at a lower price point would have been a mistake. That is one of the most famous short stories ever written, and I would not make this book any other way. I saw some comments about $350 for a short story. What people don't know is that this book had one of the lowest profit margins. It was very costly to produce, but I wanted to make it the way we did, not only to honor the author, but because that is our model. We make fine editions. Or at least, I sure try to! When people receive their copy (which should be soon), they will understand.

            Where it makes sense to print offset, I do. The next book is printed offset, mainly because of the page count. We have and will continue to print books offset, but when a story screams for letterpress, we will print that way. And yes adding 100 books will not impact pricing all that much if at all. It's the larger print runs that have the most significant impact on cost per unit. That's why we can make AGE's at that low price point.

            Anyway, I hope you don't mind me posting this. I just wanted to set this particular record straight.

            Peace.

            Comment


              Originally posted by Paul Suntup View Post

              Hi Ron! I usually just keep my mouth shut when I read an inaccurate statement online about our books (and there are many), but I happened to see this and felt I should clear things up. Let's break this down:

              The "Polymer Plate" method of 'letterpress" printing just doesn't produce the same tactile "bite" that true letterpress printing does.

              Sorry Ron, but it does. It absolutely does. We choose not to make too deep an impression though. That is intentional. Any good letterpress printer will tell you that they don't like a deep impression in the paper. There are reasons for that, and I covered this in detail in a little pamphlet we created, and included with every copy of the Numbered I Am Legend. I don't think you have a copy, but if you run your fingers over the type at the top of the first page, you will feel the impression. That pamphlet was printed letterpress using photopolymer plates. I may actually post that article on the site so that more people can read it.

              So it is not the plates that determine the impression, it's a combination of factors, including the type of paper used, and the skill of the letterpress printer who determines the amount of impression. I should add that the alternative method you allude to which is handsetting a book in metal type is simply not an option. That would push the costs beyond what we could sell a book for, or what I would expect my customers to pay. Also, you refer to this process as not being "true" letterpress printing. It's letterpress. Period.

              Regarding this:

              ...so if it's adding a "significant" cost to producing the books- I'd just as soon have them printed offset or digital like everyone else and shave that amount off the book price.

              It's highly unlikely I will ever print our books digital. Not knocking that process, but it's just not an option for me for our books. But at the heart of this statement is cost. Letterpress printing adds a lot to the cost. There is no doubt about that, and there is validity to this part of your statement. Why print letterpress when we could sell books for lower prices if we printed offset. The letterpress experience goes beyond impression in paper though. There are other differences between an offset printed book, and one printed letterpress. But what you wrote is a very good point and makes a lot of sense.

              There are many factors that go into a decision as to whether to print an edition offset or letterpress. One of the most important is price. I think of our customers first. I think of the novel itself. The author or the author's Estate. And ultimately a decision is made. For me, printing The Lottery offset simply to come out at a lower price point would have been a mistake. That is one of the most famous short stories ever written, and I would not make this book any other way. I saw some comments about $350 for a short story. What people don't know is that this book had one of the lowest profit margins. It was very costly to produce, but I wanted to make it the way we did, not only to honor the author, but because that is our model. We make fine editions. Or at least, I sure try to! When people receive their copy (which should be soon), they will understand.

              Where it makes sense to print offset, I do. The next book is printed offset, mainly because of the page count. We have and will continue to print books offset, but when a story screams for letterpress, we will print that way. And yes adding 100 books will not impact pricing all that much if at all. It's the larger print runs that have the most significant impact on cost per unit. That's why we can make AGE's at that low price point.

              Anyway, I hope you don't mind me posting this. I just wanted to set this particular record straight.

              Peace.
              Thank you for sharing this information.

              Comment


                Great post Paul. I've been doing a lot of research into letterpress the past couple of months (bought a small press for messing around with) and everything you read confirms everything that I've been reading. Impression depth is a function of 2 things, paper stock and how you actually set up the press. The plates themselves have very little to do with it.
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                Comment


                  Originally posted by Paul Suntup View Post
                  The next book is printed offset, mainly because of the page count.
                  Well Let the Right One In is 480 pages long, so...

                  Comment


                    I appreciate that post from Paul...especially taking the time to respond to someone’s concerns. I haven’t been in a position to purchase a limited edition yet...but I’ve never had a question whether they are worth their value...I’m quite sure they are. And I’m sure one day I will eventually own a limited. But for now, I’m looking forward to my gift editions of Fahrenheit 451 and 1984.

                    Comment


                      Paul, thank you for your input. Not all of your books will be for me but I absolutely respect the thought and care you put into your books.

                      Comment

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