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O T: I guess copyrights and trademarks are just no longer respected?

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    O T: I guess copyrights and trademarks are just no longer respected?

    A few months ago, just before this pandemic began, I decided I really needed to replace a favorite Bettie Page t-shirt. Mine was just very worn. So after looking I ordered from Teepublic. While the shirt looked great online, holding it in my hands I could see a flaw not noticeable online. I returned that shirt for an exchange and I found a great shirt (Or so I thought). The design on the second shirt was perfect except the artist? got one color wrong. I got to keep the second t-shirt and got a full refund. What I've noticed at Teepublic, Red Bubble, Teespring and others is there are designs available for well known copyrighted properties like Shazam!, Bettie Page, The Lone Ranger, etc... I don't know how this works. It seems to me the owners of the copyrights are not enforcing them. A lot of these designs seem clearly amateur and not officially licensed.


    Cap
    Books are weapons in the war of ideas.

    #2
    I would venture that almost none of the shirts on any of those sites are licensed. Those are the sites that advertise their "limited edition" T-shirts on Facebook. They're "limited" because they know they'll be "sold out" and taken down before anyone can file copyright violation paperwork (assuming those sites would bother to abide by such requests).

    It's pretty pathetic. Actually fighting copyright infringement can be quite expensive, and I think these people count on companies not wanting to spend the money enforcing their copyrights (assuming they find out about them).

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by c marvel View Post
      A few months ago, just before this pandemic began, I decided I really needed to replace a favorite Bettie Page t-shirt. Mine was just very worn. So after looking I ordered from Teepublic. While the shirt looked great online, holding it in my hands I could see a flaw not noticeable online. I returned that shirt for an exchange and I found a great shirt (Or so I thought). The design on the second shirt was perfect except the artist? got one color wrong. I got to keep the second t-shirt and got a full refund. What I've noticed at Teepublic, Red Bubble, Teespring and others is there are designs available for well known copyrighted properties like Shazam!, Bettie Page, The Lone Ranger, etc... I don't know how this works. It seems to me the owners of the copyrights are not enforcing them. A lot of these designs seem clearly amateur and not officially licensed.


      Cap
      Sites like those you mentioned are protected under under by the 'Safe Harbour' principle of The Digital Millennium Copyright Act. It basically states that they are not responsible for third party sellers violating copyright laws on their sites. The copyright owner would need to go after each individual seller which would basically be like playing wack-a-mole. In my view this is a major issue and the law should be corrected but a lot of money has gone into lobbying efforts.

      Comment


        #4
        Teespring takes these things a little more seriously than some of the other sites, for what it's worth.

        We sometimes post t-shirts featuring our Stephen King related artwork -- after we have secured the proper rights to use the art on apparel and paid the artist for those rights -- and Teespring used to take them down and give us a warning because we mentioned Stephen King and/or the book title in the name of the product.

        So, if you ever wonder why we post a shirt with Glenn Chadbourne's take on what is obviously Cujo but we call it "Generic Angry Dog Attacks Car Shirt" -- now you know why... We could actually lose the account if they flag us too many times!

        Edited to add: But we really like the quality of the printing and the service from Teespring, which is why we haven't switched to one of those other sites that don't care. Plus, on general principal, we think the other sites should care!

        Brian
        Brian James Freeman
        brianfreeman@cemeterydance.com

        Cemetery Dance Publications: http://www.CemeteryDance.com
        Lonely Road Books: http://www.LonelyRoadBooks.com
        Lividian Publications: http://www.Lividian.com
        My Writing: http://www.BrianJamesFreeman.com

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Brian James Freeman View Post
          Teespring takes these things a little more seriously than some of the other sites, for what it's worth.

          We sometimes post t-shirts featuring our Stephen King related artwork -- after we have secured the proper rights to use the art on apparel and paid the artist for those rights -- and Teespring used to take them down and give us a warning because we mentioned Stephen King and/or the book title in the name of the product.

          So, if you ever wonder why we post a shirt with Glenn Chadbourne's take on what is obviously Cujo but we call it "Generic Angry Dog Attacks Car Shirt" -- now you know why... We could actually lose the account if they flag us too many times!

          Edited to add: But we really like the quality of the printing and the service from Teespring, which is why we haven't switched to one of those other sites that don't care. Plus, on general principal, we think the other sites should care!

          Brian
          Yep. It's kinda a pain in the ass. It's why we've moved to doing all of our products as "unlisted" and don't add them to our Teespring store front. That said as with all of these platforms there's a lot of stuff that just gets through. Largely because there's a fair amount of legal gray area when it comes to "artists interpretation" of things.
          CD Email: danhocker@cemeterydance.com

          Non-Work related social media and what not:
          Instagram

          Buy my stuff! - https://www.etsy.com/shop/HockersWoodWorks

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Martin View Post

            Sites like those you mentioned are protected under under by the 'Safe Harbour' principle of The Digital Millennium Copyright Act. It basically states that they are not responsible for third party sellers violating copyright laws on their sites. The copyright owner would need to go after each individual seller which would basically be like playing wack-a-mole. In my view this is a major issue and the law should be corrected but a lot of money has gone into lobbying efforts.
            I know that after Bettie Page reappeared after being missing from 1958-1992 she eventually hired an agent, James L Swanson after she learned about the amazing Bettie Page fans who still remembered her. James L Swanson was fired by Bettie Page. She was nearly penniless and hadn't received any royalties. It's my understanding the heirs were attempting to regain some measure of control over the use of Bettie Page's name and image.
            Another interesting character - Dracula. Dacre Stoker, the great-grand nephew of Bram Stoker, was able to regain control of the Dracula copyright.


            Cap
            Books are weapons in the war of ideas.

            Comment


              #7
              Did Dacre Stoker successfully regain control of the copyright? I honestly had figured that Dracula was public domain, given that everyone seems to have their own version of the novel these days.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Brian James Freeman View Post
                Teespring takes these things a little more seriously than some of the other sites, for what it's worth.

                We sometimes post t-shirts featuring our Stephen King related artwork -- after we have secured the proper rights to use the art on apparel and paid the artist for those rights -- and Teespring used to take them down and give us a warning because we mentioned Stephen King and/or the book title in the name of the product.

                So, if you ever wonder why we post a shirt with Glenn Chadbourne's take on what is obviously Cujo but we call it "Generic Angry Dog Attacks Car Shirt" -- now you know why... We could actually lose the account if they flag us too many times!

                Edited to add: But we really like the quality of the printing and the service from Teespring, which is why we haven't switched to one of those other sites that don't care. Plus, on general principal, we think the other sites should care!

                Brian
                That is good information to have. Thank You.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by c marvel View Post

                  I know that after Bettie Page reappeared after being missing from 1958-1992 she eventually hired an agent, James L Swanson after she learned about the amazing Bettie Page fans who still remembered her. James L Swanson was fired by Bettie Page. She was nearly penniless and hadn't received any royalties. It's my understanding the heirs were attempting to regain some measure of control over the use of Bettie Page's name and image.
                  Another interesting character - Dracula. Dacre Stoker, the great-grand nephew of Bram Stoker, was able to regain control of the Dracula copyright.


                  Cap
                  There is a 2013 documentary on Amazon Prime (if it is still up) called Bettie Paige Reveals All. Not sure how accurate it is but it covers Hugh Hefner helping the family get representation and allowing her to live comfortably late in life. It is a pretty good documentary but I have never researched how accurate the information is.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Splync View Post
                    Did Dacre Stoker successfully regain control of the copyright? I honestly had figured that Dracula was public domain, given that everyone seems to have their own version of the novel these days.
                    I believe Dracula remains in Public domain.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Martin View Post

                      There is a 2013 documentary on Amazon Prime (if it is still up) called Bettie Paige Reveals All. Not sure how accurate it is but it covers Hugh Hefner helping the family get representation and allowing her to live comfortably late in life. It is a pretty good documentary but I have never researched how accurate the information is.
                      It is accurate and based on coversations the director Mark Mori had w. Bettie Page. I have two copies of that DVD. I did notice a discrepancy in Bettie Page Reveals All as opposed to her autobiography book. I'd have to rewatch Reveals All, but I'm unsure it touches on some of the stuff that happened that got Bettie Page in some hot water.

                      Cap
                      Last edited by c marvel; 06-11-2020, 03:34 AM.
                      Books are weapons in the war of ideas.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Splync View Post
                        Did Dacre Stoker successfully regain control of the copyright? I honestly had figured that Dracula was public domain, given that everyone seems to have their own version of the novel these days.
                        I'm unsure, but I think he did. ~Cap
                        Books are weapons in the war of ideas.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by c marvel View Post

                          It is accurate and based on coversations the director Mark Mori had w. Bettie Page. I have two copies of that DVD. ~Cap
                          Good to hear, I really enjoyed the documentary.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Martin View Post

                            I believe Dracula remains in Public domain.
                            Correct. Dracula is public domain. I don't think there was any way for Dacre to regain the copyright. Dracula wasn't even copywritten in the US (which mattered at the time). Per UK laws the copyright was secure for 50 years after Stoker's death before becoming public domain.

                            Those laws aren't the same anymore though. Thanks Disney...
                            CD Email: danhocker@cemeterydance.com

                            Non-Work related social media and what not:
                            Instagram

                            Buy my stuff! - https://www.etsy.com/shop/HockersWoodWorks

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Dan Hocker View Post

                              Correct. Dracula is public domain. I don't think there was any way for Dacre to regain the copyright. Dracula wasn't even copywritten in the US (which mattered at the time). Per UK laws the copyright was secure for 50 years after Stoker's death before becoming public domain.

                              Those laws aren't the same anymore though. Thanks Disney...
                              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dacre_Stoker
                              Books are weapons in the war of ideas.

                              Comment

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