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  • sholloman81
    replied
    Originally posted by Splync View Post
    If there is somewhere else on the forums that would be more appropriate, please let me know! But I figured I'd share my review of Dark Across the Bay, if there was anyone interested...

    Dark Across the Bay by Ania Ahlborn

    We’ve all had some pretty horrific family vacations, right? Every family has always had one that didn’t quite go as planned. Maybe the weather didn’t cooperate. Maybe the family fought the whole time. But if it was anything short of tragedy, then Ania Ahlborn is here to show you that the family trip can be a hell of a lot worse!

    In Ahlborn’s latest, Dark Across the Bay, we follow the Parrish family on a much-needed getaway to quiet island off the coast of Raven’s Head, Maine. Poppy, the matriarch, is attempting to save her rocky marriage and is trying to keep her family together. Leo, the eldest child, is mourning the loss of his best friend and is ready to move to Thailand in his memory. Lark, the youngest child, is a fledging author with her face glued to her phone. And the house that they will be staying in is an oddity in its own right; windows of all shapes and sizes, an off-kilter roof, hidden passageways in the walls, and plenty of dark corners throughout.

    It becomes apparent from the very first night that something is off about their stay in this rental home. Lark begins receiving strange texts, messages are found around the house, and it becomes clear that someone is there with them, lurking in the shadows and passageways throughout the house. Suddenly the Parrish’s vacation becomes a fight for survival!

    There have been several comparisons between Dark Across the Bay and Cape Fear (or The Executioners, as it was originally known), but this isn’t really a fair comparison. True, both stories tell tales of families being stalked in a secluded environment, but the similarities stop there. Cape Fear features a family running away from an ever-present danger, while the Parrish family in Ahlborn’s novel is getting away to try and heal whatever is left of their “happy family” unit. The Parrish family is actually where Ahlborn’s novel shines the brightest.
    Ania Ahlborn has always written unbelievably real characters. Jack in her debut novel Seed was a realistic father with a very haunted past. Michael from Brother is an incredibly sympathetic protagonist thrust against his psychotically unstable family. Ahlborn knows how to write characters as if they were real people and the Parrish family is no exception. Lark is a teenage girl that has fully committed to her all-goth internet persona and feels real through and through. Leo’s grunge appearance and personality is as authentic as many high school teenagers. Poppy’s concerns and motivations are that of a real mother. Ezra, the father, reacts to his surroundings in the same way that many people have reacted to similar situations or emergencies. The interactions between the family members always feels real and true to the characters, for which the novel shines.

    The plot itself also grabs hold of the reader. Reading more like a thriller than a horror novel, the plot hooks you in from its first pages and never lets you go. With the exception of the prologue, each chapter is presented from the POV of a member of the Parrish family. Each chapter presents that character’s perspective on their happenings and gives you another piece to the overall puzzle that is going on. As more and more information is revealed, the book gets more and more addictive. And then the novel is over far too quickly.
    If there has to be one criticism of the novel, it would be that it is over too quickly! At 242 pages, Dark Across the Bay is an appropriate length for a thriller of this nature. However, the second act could surely be longer. The stalker is revealed around halfway through the novel and while there are still pieces of the puzzle to be uncovered and things certainly don’t slow down, it would still have been nice for there to have been more to the “ominously stalked from the shadows” portion of the novel. It should also be stated that while there could have been more, the pacing of the overall novel does not feel rushed. It’s a short and quick ride, but it’s still one hell of a ride nonetheless.

    Overall, Ania Ahlborn has crafted a well-written novel that is really a thriller at its heart. Fans of her horror titles shouldn’t be turned away by this slight shift in genre. Even Stephen King has written titles that could more easily be described as thrillers than straight out horror novels. Dark Across the Bay doesn’t have any supernatural elements, but it doesn’t need them. What it does have is a family so genuine that you could have sworn that you’ve met one or two of them before. It has imagery that will have you hooked from the opening chapter. And it has the speed and thrill of a rollercoaster that you can’t wait to get back on once it has finished.

    Ania Ahlborn is a fresh voice in horror, who has written a dozen novels and novellas, starting with the self-published Seed. Two of her titles, Seed and Brother, have both received the high-end limited edition treatment from Suntup Editions, both of which have sold out. Dark Across the Bay is being published exclusively as a signed limited edition from Earthling Publications. It is limited to 500 signed and numbered copies, as well as 15 signed and lettered copies. It will be published in July of 2021, though the title has completely sold out via pre-orders. The novel features an introduction by Stoker Award winning author (man, it feels great to say that) Josh Malerman, who is also signing all of the copies. Please check out the secondary market for copies or keep an eye out for future editions of this title.

    This review was made possible thanks to Paul Miller from Earthing Publications, whom provided me with an Advanced Reader’s Copy of the title. Thank you so much Paul! Ania Ahlborn truly knocked it out of the park and this will make for a great publication. Thank you very much for reading!
    Great review Splync! Am very glad that I was able to snag a copy during the pre-order window. This will be my first book by Ahlborn and I can't wait to give it a go.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sock Monkey
    replied
    Originally posted by Splync View Post
    If there is somewhere else on the forums that would be more appropriate, please let me know! But I figured I'd share my review of Dark Across the Bay, if there was anyone interested...

    Dark Across the Bay by Ania Ahlborn

    We’ve all had some pretty horrific family vacations, right? Every family has always had one that didn’t quite go as planned. Maybe the weather didn’t cooperate. Maybe the family fought the whole time. But if it was anything short of tragedy, then Ania Ahlborn is here to show you that the family trip can be a hell of a lot worse!

    In Ahlborn’s latest, Dark Across the Bay, we follow the Parrish family on a much-needed getaway to quiet island off the coast of Raven’s Head, Maine. Poppy, the matriarch, is attempting to save her rocky marriage and is trying to keep her family together. Leo, the eldest child, is mourning the loss of his best friend and is ready to move to Thailand in his memory. Lark, the youngest child, is a fledging author with her face glued to her phone. And the house that they will be staying in is an oddity in its own right; windows of all shapes and sizes, an off-kilter roof, hidden passageways in the walls, and plenty of dark corners throughout.

    It becomes apparent from the very first night that something is off about their stay in this rental home. Lark begins receiving strange texts, messages are found around the house, and it becomes clear that someone is there with them, lurking in the shadows and passageways throughout the house. Suddenly the Parrish’s vacation becomes a fight for survival!

    There have been several comparisons between Dark Across the Bay and Cape Fear (or The Executioners, as it was originally known), but this isn’t really a fair comparison. True, both stories tell tales of families being stalked in a secluded environment, but the similarities stop there. Cape Fear features a family running away from an ever-present danger, while the Parrish family in Ahlborn’s novel is getting away to try and heal whatever is left of their “happy family” unit. The Parrish family is actually where Ahlborn’s novel shines the brightest.
    Ania Ahlborn has always written unbelievably real characters. Jack in her debut novel Seed was a realistic father with a very haunted past. Michael from Brother is an incredibly sympathetic protagonist thrust against his psychotically unstable family. Ahlborn knows how to write characters as if they were real people and the Parrish family is no exception. Lark is a teenage girl that has fully committed to her all-goth internet persona and feels real through and through. Leo’s grunge appearance and personality is as authentic as many high school teenagers. Poppy’s concerns and motivations are that of a real mother. Ezra, the father, reacts to his surroundings in the same way that many people have reacted to similar situations or emergencies. The interactions between the family members always feels real and true to the characters, for which the novel shines.

    The plot itself also grabs hold of the reader. Reading more like a thriller than a horror novel, the plot hooks you in from its first pages and never lets you go. With the exception of the prologue, each chapter is presented from the POV of a member of the Parrish family. Each chapter presents that character’s perspective on their happenings and gives you another piece to the overall puzzle that is going on. As more and more information is revealed, the book gets more and more addictive. And then the novel is over far too quickly.
    If there has to be one criticism of the novel, it would be that it is over too quickly! At 242 pages, Dark Across the Bay is an appropriate length for a thriller of this nature. However, the second act could surely be longer. The stalker is revealed around halfway through the novel and while there are still pieces of the puzzle to be uncovered and things certainly don’t slow down, it would still have been nice for there to have been more to the “ominously stalked from the shadows” portion of the novel. It should also be stated that while there could have been more, the pacing of the overall novel does not feel rushed. It’s a short and quick ride, but it’s still one hell of a ride nonetheless.

    Overall, Ania Ahlborn has crafted a well-written novel that is really a thriller at its heart. Fans of her horror titles shouldn’t be turned away by this slight shift in genre. Even Stephen King has written titles that could more easily be described as thrillers than straight out horror novels. Dark Across the Bay doesn’t have any supernatural elements, but it doesn’t need them. What it does have is a family so genuine that you could have sworn that you’ve met one or two of them before. It has imagery that will have you hooked from the opening chapter. And it has the speed and thrill of a rollercoaster that you can’t wait to get back on once it has finished.

    Ania Ahlborn is a fresh voice in horror, who has written a dozen novels and novellas, starting with the self-published Seed. Two of her titles, Seed and Brother, have both received the high-end limited edition treatment from Suntup Editions, both of which have sold out. Dark Across the Bay is being published exclusively as a signed limited edition from Earthling Publications. It is limited to 500 signed and numbered copies, as well as 15 signed and lettered copies. It will be published in July of 2021, though the title has completely sold out via pre-orders. The novel features an introduction by Stoker Award winning author (man, it feels great to say that) Josh Malerman, who is also signing all of the copies. Please check out the secondary market for copies or keep an eye out for future editions of this title.

    This review was made possible thanks to Paul Miller from Earthing Publications, whom provided me with an Advanced Reader’s Copy of the title. Thank you so much Paul! Ania Ahlborn truly knocked it out of the park and this will make for a great publication. Thank you very much for reading!
    Man, now I really regret passing on this book. Great review!

    Leave a comment:


  • Martin
    replied
    Originally posted by Splync View Post
    If there is somewhere else on the forums that would be more appropriate, please let me know! But I figured I'd share my review of Dark Across the Bay, if there was anyone interested...

    Dark Across the Bay by Ania Ahlborn

    We’ve all had some pretty horrific family vacations, right? Every family has always had one that didn’t quite go as planned. Maybe the weather didn’t cooperate. Maybe the family fought the whole time. But if it was anything short of tragedy, then Ania Ahlborn is here to show you that the family trip can be a hell of a lot worse!

    In Ahlborn’s latest, Dark Across the Bay, we follow the Parrish family on a much-needed getaway to quiet island off the coast of Raven’s Head, Maine. Poppy, the matriarch, is attempting to save her rocky marriage and is trying to keep her family together. Leo, the eldest child, is mourning the loss of his best friend and is ready to move to Thailand in his memory. Lark, the youngest child, is a fledging author with her face glued to her phone. And the house that they will be staying in is an oddity in its own right; windows of all shapes and sizes, an off-kilter roof, hidden passageways in the walls, and plenty of dark corners throughout.

    It becomes apparent from the very first night that something is off about their stay in this rental home. Lark begins receiving strange texts, messages are found around the house, and it becomes clear that someone is there with them, lurking in the shadows and passageways throughout the house. Suddenly the Parrish’s vacation becomes a fight for survival!

    There have been several comparisons between Dark Across the Bay and Cape Fear (or The Executioners, as it was originally known), but this isn’t really a fair comparison. True, both stories tell tales of families being stalked in a secluded environment, but the similarities stop there. Cape Fear features a family running away from an ever-present danger, while the Parrish family in Ahlborn’s novel is getting away to try and heal whatever is left of their “happy family” unit. The Parrish family is actually where Ahlborn’s novel shines the brightest.
    Ania Ahlborn has always written unbelievably real characters. Jack in her debut novel Seed was a realistic father with a very haunted past. Michael from Brother is an incredibly sympathetic protagonist thrust against his psychotically unstable family. Ahlborn knows how to write characters as if they were real people and the Parrish family is no exception. Lark is a teenage girl that has fully committed to her all-goth internet persona and feels real through and through. Leo’s grunge appearance and personality is as authentic as many high school teenagers. Poppy’s concerns and motivations are that of a real mother. Ezra, the father, reacts to his surroundings in the same way that many people have reacted to similar situations or emergencies. The interactions between the family members always feels real and true to the characters, for which the novel shines.

    The plot itself also grabs hold of the reader. Reading more like a thriller than a horror novel, the plot hooks you in from its first pages and never lets you go. With the exception of the prologue, each chapter is presented from the POV of a member of the Parrish family. Each chapter presents that character’s perspective on their happenings and gives you another piece to the overall puzzle that is going on. As more and more information is revealed, the book gets more and more addictive. And then the novel is over far too quickly.
    If there has to be one criticism of the novel, it would be that it is over too quickly! At 242 pages, Dark Across the Bay is an appropriate length for a thriller of this nature. However, the second act could surely be longer. The stalker is revealed around halfway through the novel and while there are still pieces of the puzzle to be uncovered and things certainly don’t slow down, it would still have been nice for there to have been more to the “ominously stalked from the shadows” portion of the novel. It should also be stated that while there could have been more, the pacing of the overall novel does not feel rushed. It’s a short and quick ride, but it’s still one hell of a ride nonetheless.

    Overall, Ania Ahlborn has crafted a well-written novel that is really a thriller at its heart. Fans of her horror titles shouldn’t be turned away by this slight shift in genre. Even Stephen King has written titles that could more easily be described as thrillers than straight out horror novels. Dark Across the Bay doesn’t have any supernatural elements, but it doesn’t need them. What it does have is a family so genuine that you could have sworn that you’ve met one or two of them before. It has imagery that will have you hooked from the opening chapter. And it has the speed and thrill of a rollercoaster that you can’t wait to get back on once it has finished.

    Ania Ahlborn is a fresh voice in horror, who has written a dozen novels and novellas, starting with the self-published Seed. Two of her titles, Seed and Brother, have both received the high-end limited edition treatment from Suntup Editions, both of which have sold out. Dark Across the Bay is being published exclusively as a signed limited edition from Earthling Publications. It is limited to 500 signed and numbered copies, as well as 15 signed and lettered copies. It will be published in July of 2021, though the title has completely sold out via pre-orders. The novel features an introduction by Stoker Award winning author (man, it feels great to say that) Josh Malerman, who is also signing all of the copies. Please check out the secondary market for copies or keep an eye out for future editions of this title.

    This review was made possible thanks to Paul Miller from Earthing Publications, whom provided me with an Advanced Reader’s Copy of the title. Thank you so much Paul! Ania Ahlborn truly knocked it out of the park and this will make for a great publication. Thank you very much for reading!
    Thanks for the review. Unfortunately I missed out on the ARC but have the book on order. Looking forward to reading it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Splync
    replied
    If there is somewhere else on the forums that would be more appropriate, please let me know! But I figured I'd share my review of Dark Across the Bay, if there was anyone interested...

    Dark Across the Bay by Ania Ahlborn

    We’ve all had some pretty horrific family vacations, right? Every family has always had one that didn’t quite go as planned. Maybe the weather didn’t cooperate. Maybe the family fought the whole time. But if it was anything short of tragedy, then Ania Ahlborn is here to show you that the family trip can be a hell of a lot worse!

    In Ahlborn’s latest, Dark Across the Bay, we follow the Parrish family on a much-needed getaway to quiet island off the coast of Raven’s Head, Maine. Poppy, the matriarch, is attempting to save her rocky marriage and is trying to keep her family together. Leo, the eldest child, is mourning the loss of his best friend and is ready to move to Thailand in his memory. Lark, the youngest child, is a fledging author with her face glued to her phone. And the house that they will be staying in is an oddity in its own right; windows of all shapes and sizes, an off-kilter roof, hidden passageways in the walls, and plenty of dark corners throughout.

    It becomes apparent from the very first night that something is off about their stay in this rental home. Lark begins receiving strange texts, messages are found around the house, and it becomes clear that someone is there with them, lurking in the shadows and passageways throughout the house. Suddenly the Parrish’s vacation becomes a fight for survival!

    There have been several comparisons between Dark Across the Bay and Cape Fear (or The Executioners, as it was originally known), but this isn’t really a fair comparison. True, both stories tell tales of families being stalked in a secluded environment, but the similarities stop there. Cape Fear features a family running away from an ever-present danger, while the Parrish family in Ahlborn’s novel is getting away to try and heal whatever is left of their “happy family” unit. The Parrish family is actually where Ahlborn’s novel shines the brightest.
    Ania Ahlborn has always written unbelievably real characters. Jack in her debut novel Seed was a realistic father with a very haunted past. Michael from Brother is an incredibly sympathetic protagonist thrust against his psychotically unstable family. Ahlborn knows how to write characters as if they were real people and the Parrish family is no exception. Lark is a teenage girl that has fully committed to her all-goth internet persona and feels real through and through. Leo’s grunge appearance and personality is as authentic as many high school teenagers. Poppy’s concerns and motivations are that of a real mother. Ezra, the father, reacts to his surroundings in the same way that many people have reacted to similar situations or emergencies. The interactions between the family members always feels real and true to the characters, for which the novel shines.

    The plot itself also grabs hold of the reader. Reading more like a thriller than a horror novel, the plot hooks you in from its first pages and never lets you go. With the exception of the prologue, each chapter is presented from the POV of a member of the Parrish family. Each chapter presents that character’s perspective on their happenings and gives you another piece to the overall puzzle that is going on. As more and more information is revealed, the book gets more and more addictive. And then the novel is over far too quickly.
    If there has to be one criticism of the novel, it would be that it is over too quickly! At 242 pages, Dark Across the Bay is an appropriate length for a thriller of this nature. However, the second act could surely be longer. The stalker is revealed around halfway through the novel and while there are still pieces of the puzzle to be uncovered and things certainly don’t slow down, it would still have been nice for there to have been more to the “ominously stalked from the shadows” portion of the novel. It should also be stated that while there could have been more, the pacing of the overall novel does not feel rushed. It’s a short and quick ride, but it’s still one hell of a ride nonetheless.

    Overall, Ania Ahlborn has crafted a well-written novel that is really a thriller at its heart. Fans of her horror titles shouldn’t be turned away by this slight shift in genre. Even Stephen King has written titles that could more easily be described as thrillers than straight out horror novels. Dark Across the Bay doesn’t have any supernatural elements, but it doesn’t need them. What it does have is a family so genuine that you could have sworn that you’ve met one or two of them before. It has imagery that will have you hooked from the opening chapter. And it has the speed and thrill of a rollercoaster that you can’t wait to get back on once it has finished.

    Ania Ahlborn is a fresh voice in horror, who has written a dozen novels and novellas, starting with the self-published Seed. Two of her titles, Seed and Brother, have both received the high-end limited edition treatment from Suntup Editions, both of which have sold out. Dark Across the Bay is being published exclusively as a signed limited edition from Earthling Publications. It is limited to 500 signed and numbered copies, as well as 15 signed and lettered copies. It will be published in July of 2021, though the title has completely sold out via pre-orders. The novel features an introduction by Stoker Award winning author (man, it feels great to say that) Josh Malerman, who is also signing all of the copies. Please check out the secondary market for copies or keep an eye out for future editions of this title.

    This review was made possible thanks to Paul Miller from Earthing Publications, whom provided me with an Advanced Reader’s Copy of the title. Thank you so much Paul! Ania Ahlborn truly knocked it out of the park and this will make for a great publication. Thank you very much for reading!

    Leave a comment:


  • Martin
    replied
    Originally posted by Ben Staad View Post
    I missed out. I replied right before I posted here and was told they were gone in about 10 minutes. No surprise.


    I just received the same note. I thought a half hour was going to be a push. On well.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ben Staad
    replied
    I missed out. I replied right before I posted here and was told they were gone in about 10 minutes. No surprise.

    Originally posted by Martin View Post

    I was on a conference call and replied at just about a half hour after receipt. Hopefully I was not too late.

    Leave a comment:


  • Martin
    replied
    Originally posted by Ben Staad View Post
    Anyone else see the email about a free galley/ARC sent out about 30 minutes or so? Better hurry though.
    I was on a conference call and replied at just about a half hour after receipt. Hopefully I was not too late.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ben Staad
    replied
    Anyone else see the email about a free galley/ARC sent out about 30 minutes or so? Better hurry though.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian James Freeman
    replied
    Very much looking forward to this one! Great writer + awesome cover artwork + Earthling's top notch production values makes this an easy buy for me.

    Leave a comment:


  • sholloman81
    replied
    Just pre-ordered! With the free US shipping if pre-ordered by Wednesday, this was a smoking deal!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Ben Staad
    replied
    Woot! At a price point I can think about as well which is a bonus.

    Leave a comment:


  • Earthling Press - new Ania Ahlborn book available now.

    Here's the order link for Ania Ahlborn's new book. It's been made available on FB, so it's no secret at this point.

    http://www.earthlingpub.com/aa_darkacross.html
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