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  • Martin
    replied
    Originally posted by RonClinton View Post
    To me, the book was too much an unpleasant small-town soap opera, while the film was, at heart, a monster movie. Very different, and I kind of wish they'd both had a better balance of small-town drama and monster thrills...the former more thrills and less soap, and the latter more focus on characterization and interpersonal drama. But in general, I prefer the film vastly more than the book, a book that I'm hardpressed to recommend to anyone...it's one of those works I respect for what it inspired (and my AE of the Suntup should be here today!), but as a reading experience it leaves a great deal to be desired.
    I enjoy the novel but agree with the 'Soap opera' statement.

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  • RonClinton
    replied
    To me, the book was too much an unpleasant small-town soap opera, while the film was, at heart, a monster movie. Very different, and I kind of wish they'd both had a better balance of small-town drama and monster thrills...the former more thrills and less soap, and the latter more focus on characterization and interpersonal drama. But in general, I prefer the film vastly more than the book, a book that I'm hardpressed to recommend to anyone...it's one of those works I respect for what it inspired (and my AE of the Suntup should be here today!), but as a reading experience it leaves a great deal to be desired.

    Leave a comment:


  • Martin
    replied
    Originally posted by sholloman81 View Post
    Just finished reading my Suntup AGE of Jaws. First time reading Jaws and I enjoyed it. I was very surprised by the sense of dread the author was able to create considering I could practically quote the movie verbatim. I also really enjoyed seeing the differences between the book and movie. Didn't quite realize how much had been removed or changed, perhaps for the better. While reading the book, I absolutely hated the Ellen Brody character, and poor Quint received a poorer death scene in my opinion. I also enjoyed the heck out of the ending of the book. Think I like it much better than the ending of the movie. Overall, glad to have finally read this book and am very glad to have the Suntu edition of my shelves.

    Am now going to begin Jack Ketchum's Ladies Night. Was finally able to snag a nice hard cover copy via the Pelan sale over at Centipede Press.
    I completely agree with your assessments of Jaws the movie vs Jaws the book. I like them both, but they have some significant differences. The main difference revolving around Ellen Brody and how despicable of a person she is. I do not think he wife's story would have played well in the movie. I also think the book ending was related to the events surrounding the wife, so the movie ending is correct for the story being told.

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  • sholloman81
    replied
    Just finished reading my Suntup AGE of Jaws. First time reading Jaws and I enjoyed it. I was very surprised by the sense of dread the author was able to create considering I could practically quote the movie verbatim. I also really enjoyed seeing the differences between the book and movie. Didn't quite realize how much had been removed or changed, perhaps for the better. While reading the book, I absolutely hated the Ellen Brody character, and poor Quint received a much more tragic death scene in my opinion. I also enjoyed the heck out of the ending of the book. Think I like it much better than the ending of the movie. Overall, glad to have finally read this book and am very glad to have the Suntup edition of my shelves.

    Am now going to begin Jack Ketchum's Ladies Night. Was finally able to snag a nice hard cover copy via the Pelan sale over at Centipede Press.
    Last edited by sholloman81; 05-25-2022, 06:41 PM. Reason: spelling edit

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  • RonClinton
    replied
    Originally posted by brlesh View Post
    Finished Something in the Water by Douglas Wynne.

    This was the first thing I’ve read by Wynne, & found it to be a an enjoyable collection of Lovecraftian themed stories.

    Then onto Survivor Song by Paul Tremblay.

    Half way through, and really like this one do far.

    The first half of the book (150 pages) only covers a 3 hour timeframe but the pacing of the story never waivers.

    This story flies by.

    At times horrific, at other times laugh out loud funny.

    I can’t wait to see how the last half of book goes.

    B
    Agreed, SURVIVOR SONG was terrific...very fast-paced, very immersive. Thinking back on that one makes me even more excited for his new one, THE PALLBEARER'S CLUB, due out in a month or two.

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  • brlesh
    replied
    Finished Something in the Water by Douglas Wynne.

    This was the first thing I’ve read by Wynne, & found it to be a an enjoyable collection of Lovecraftian themed stories.

    Then onto Survivor Song by Paul Tremblay.

    Half way through, and really like this one do far.

    The first half of the book (150 pages) only covers a 3 hour timeframe but the pacing of the story never waivers.

    This story flies by.

    At times horrific, at other times laugh out loud funny.

    I can’t wait to see how the last half of book goes.

    B

    Leave a comment:


  • brlesh
    replied
    Finished up High Moor by Graeme Reynolds the other night.

    It was an OK werewolf story, though Reynolds did throw a couple twists into the ending that kind of spiked my interest in picking up the next book in the series.

    After HM, I started Something in the Water & Other Stories, a Lovecraftian themed collection by Douglas Wynne.

    About half way through, and enjoying it so far.

    B

    Leave a comment:


  • c marvel
    replied
    Wow, it's been a while since I posted on the Currently Reading thread. I'll begin with the two books I'm readng now -- Attack of the Jazz Giants by Gregory Frost and a Dollar Double book Design for Debauchery by March Hastings/My Mother, The Madam by Warner Jackson.
    Since I last posted I I finished reading The Skull Ring by Scott Nicholson, Killer's Diary by Brian Pinkerton (Excellent book), The Laughing Buddha Murders by Richard Foster, The Hardy Boys Adventures #5-Peril at Granite Peak. I wanted to see how a modern Hardy Boys book compared to their classic novels.

    Cap

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  • TacomaDiver
    replied
    Originally posted by TacomaDiver View Post
    but recently started to finally read Carlos Ruiz Zafon's The Shadow of the Wind.
    This was a STRUGGLE to get through.

    Not that it's a bad book, but it took me three months to read and I have no interest in the others in the series.

    I don't know if it was an issue with the translation, or just the fact it was almost 500 pages, but I had a hard time reading more than a couple of pages at a time. I didn't hate it, I just don't think it's for me.

    Leave a comment:


  • TacomaDiver
    replied
    Originally posted by mhatchett View Post
    Started Ben Aaronovitch's Rivers of London. the series looks interesting..
    I bough the whole series (in paperback) because it seemed fun. I read the first one, it was decent, but never got around to reading the second. Mostly my issue, not the book's. I kind of expect that my wife will enjoy them more.

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  • sholloman81
    replied
    Finally finished off Clive Barker's Imajica. Enjoyed the heck out of it. Was perhaps a little bloated, but, considering the topics the author was writing about, it doesn't really hurt the book. The book was jammed full of unique characters, ideas, and world-building. While I can understand the author not wanting to do a direct sequel, I'm surprised to hear that he's never gone back into the world of this story (that I know of). So much there to explore. This book definitely has me wanting to read some more Barker.

    Am going to read my Suntup AGE of The Collector next. Been many years since I have read this book. I remember really enjoying it; however, it was so long ago that I'm sure the read will feel fresh to me.

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  • mhatchett
    replied
    Started Ben Aaronovitch's Rivers of London. the series looks interesting..

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  • brlesh
    replied
    Have not read Imajica yet (it’s on my TBR pile), but I would agree with RC that it appears to be one of the more fantastical stories, probably more similar to Weaveworld than the Books of Blood, though Barker’s works, even his more outright horror stories (Damnation Game, Books of Blood, Cabal) have a strong fantasy element running through them.

    Weaveworld is one my favorites, though you really can’t wrong with any of his early works.

    B


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  • brlesh
    replied
    Finished Eternal Frankenstein ed by Ross Lockhart. Not bad, not great. Had some interesting takes on the Frankenstein mythos.

    Next up, High Moor by Graeme Reynolds. Nearly half way through & enjoying the story so far. It’s a classic werewolf story, with all the classic WW tropes (full moon, walks on two feet, silver). Still, it is a fast paced story & Reynolds writes in an engaging manner.

    B

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  • RonClinton
    replied
    Tonight I'm starting BLACKTOP WASTLELAND, the MidWorld S/L edition. Been waiting to read this one for a long while (almost picked up a signed UK 1st HC shortly after publication), but held off once MidWorld announced their version so I could read it in this edition.

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