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RIP Jack Ketchum:

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    RIP Jack Ketchum:

    It is being reported that Dallas Mayr (Jack Ketchum) has passed away. I am very saddened to hear this.

    #2
    His passing is also mentioned on Facebook. Jack Ketchum had become one of my favorite authors. RIP sir.


    Cap
    Books are weapons in the war of ideas.

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      #3
      Really, really sorry to see this...I'd of course no idea he was ill, so this comes as a shock. Condolences to the friends and family of one of my favorite authors...very sad for anyone who appreciated exemplary horror/suspense fiction. His contributions will be missed, but what he left behind stands as testament to his talent.

      I had the enviable opportunity to interview him for Cemetery Dance Magazine, and he was an absolute pleasure. RIP, good sir.
      Twitter: https://twitter.com/ron_clinton

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        #4
        This news deeply saddens me. As am sure are most people on this forum, I am a huge fan of his work. For me his best work exemplified how horror fiction can pull no punches and deeply unsettle yet have a moral center that never allows the graphic nature of the work to become exploitative or cheap.

        My condolences to his friends and family.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Sock Monkey View Post
          This news deeply saddens me. As am sure are most people on this forum, I am a huge fan of his work. For me his best work exemplified how horror fiction can pull no punches and deeply unsettle yet have a moral center that never allows the graphic nature of the work to become exploitative or cheap.

          My condolences to his friends and family.
          Nicely put Sock Monkey.


          Cap
          Books are weapons in the war of ideas.

          Comment


            #6
            I gotta say--I wonder and worry about Dark Regions. I thought their write up on Jack Ketchum was cold and self-promotional. Not at all what I was hoping to see from the people who just released the 35th anniversary edition of his horror-quake novel. There have been so many beautiful tributes floating around since Dallas passed that I was burning to know what DRP would do. But I guess it's what should be expected from a publisher who has placed a virtual tip jar on their website.

            I just want my editions of Bird Box and then I can stop checking their site.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by jeffingoff View Post
              I gotta say--I wonder and worry about Dark Regions. I thought their write up on Jack Ketchum was cold and self-promotional. Not at all what I was hoping to see from the people who just released the 35th anniversary edition of his horror-quake novel. There have been so many beautiful tributes floating around since Dallas passed that I was burning to know what DRP would do. But I guess it's what should be expected from a publisher who has placed a virtual tip jar on their website.

              I just want my editions of Bird Box and then I can stop checking their site.
              Huh. I am certainly not a Dark Regions apologist, but I didn’t get that vibe from their write-up...true, the book published was mentioned. But it seems to be to me more of a reflection of the project and the publisher/author relationship and collaboration that spawned it than blatant self promotion. In any event, I’m just glad to see remembrances of Dallas posted in so many venues, this is just one of many, many that I’ve read over the last day. That’s good to see...he’s certainly deserving of all recognition and acclaim .
              Twitter: https://twitter.com/ron_clinton

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by RonClinton View Post
                Huh. I am certainly not a Dark Regions apologist, but I didnít get that vibe from their write-up...true, the book published was mentioned. But it seems to be to me more of a reflection of the project and the publisher/author relationship and collaboration that spawned it than blatant self promotion. In any event, Iím just glad to see remembrances of Dallas posted in so many venues, this is just one of many, many that Iíve read over the last day. Thatís good to see...heís certainly deserving of all recognition and acclaim .
                Every account I read described him as a mentor and as someone who showed terrific kindness. Sounds like this kick-ass author was also an exceptional human.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by jeffingoff View Post
                  Every account I read described him as a mentor and as someone who showed terrific kindness. Sounds like this kick-ass author was also an exceptional human.
                  Along with the aforementioned (virtual) interview for Cemetery Dance Magazine that I conducted with him, I also had the pleasure of meeting him in person in 2001 at the World Horror Convention (WHC) here in Seattle. A friend of mine in Australia wanted for reasons that now escape me an ax signed by Ketchum. So I bought a new hatchet and took it with me to the WHC (this was before security was presumably tightened at such venues), and in the signing room I walked up to Dallas' table, pulled several books of my gun range bag...and then the hatchet, the fluoescent lights glinting on its honed edges as I pulled it out of the bag. That he didn't either yell or tackle me as I drew it out but instead smiled and took the request in good humor is certainly a testament of his amenable, kind nature.
                  Twitter: https://twitter.com/ron_clinton

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by RonClinton View Post
                    Along with the aforementioned (virtual) interview for Cemetery Dance Magazine that I conducted with him, I also had the pleasure of meeting him in person in 2001 at the World Horror Convention (WHC) here in Seattle. A friend of mine in Australia wanted for reasons that now escape me an ax signed by Ketchum. So I bought a new hatchet and took it with me to the WHC (this was before security was presumably tightened at such venues), and in the signing room I walked up to Dallas' table, pulled several books of my gun range bag...and then the hatchet, the fluoescent lights glinting on its honed edges as I pulled it out of the bag. That he didn't either yell or tackle me as I drew it out but instead smiled and took the request in good humor is certainly a testament of his amenable, kind nature.
                    What a wonderful story! Thank you for sharing that. I so wish I could have met him.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by jeffingoff View Post
                      I gotta say--I wonder and worry about Dark Regions. I thought their write up on Jack Ketchum was cold and self-promotional. Not at all what I was hoping to see from the people who just released the 35th anniversary edition of his horror-quake novel. There have been so many beautiful tributes floating around since Dallas passed that I was burning to know what DRP would do. But I guess it's what should be expected from a publisher who has placed a virtual tip jar on their website.

                      I just want my editions of Bird Box and then I can stop checking their site.
                      I did not take offense to their statement. I think the first paragraph was good, the rest not so much. The took the time to talk about him and I appreciate that.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        My first Ketchum book was Weed Species what a bazaar book. I could not get enough of him from that point on. Any new Ketchum release was a must get. The Girl Next Door still haunts me to this day. I have been feeling really down about this loss. Such a great writer. Think tonight it's time to crack open one of his books and celebrate his greatness.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by bookworm 1 View Post
                          My first Ketchum book was Weed Species what a bazaar book. I could not get enough of him from that point on. Any new Ketchum release was a must get. The Girl Next Door still haunts me to this day. I have been feeling really down about this loss. Such a great writer. Think tonight it's time to crack open one of his books and celebrate his greatness.
                          I loved Weed Species. I can't think of a Ketchum story that I did not like.

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