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The Institute by Stephen King

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    #31
    They're at it again:

    The Institute variants

    Comment


      #32
      Originally posted by Brian861 View Post
      They're at it again:

      The Institute variants
      They're right up their IDW when it comes to excessive variants.

      Comment


        #33
        Originally posted by TacomaDiver View Post
        They're right up their IDW when it comes to excessive variants.
        And I'll buy them

        Comment


          #34
          The New York Times didn't much care for THE INSTITUTE (and, yes, I'm cherry-picking the review for the negative portion...but that negative portion essentially makes up half of the review...and, sigh, more Trump hysteria laced within King's narrative):

          https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/08/b...phen-king.html

          I read “The Institute” quickly and painlessly and I tried to enjoy myself. That I didn’t is partly a matter of temperament. I generally want to smack a (fictional) kid with special powers. I don’t care about quests or magic or Vulcan mind-melding. Yet I can suspend my predispositions. The right writer can convince me to stick around. King kept me marginally on the hook.

          “The Institute” buries itself under a self-generating avalanche of clichés. I began to underline them but I had to stop after a while; carpal tunnel is no joke. “Funny as a rubber crutch,” “seeya later, alligator,” “serious as a heart attack,” “none of your beeswax,” “coals to Newcastle,” “touch him with a 10-foot pole,” “not in Kansas anymore,” “go big or go home” — they’re termites, and they collapse this house before it’s even partially up. To be fair to King, he sometimes uses these half-mockingly and is partially in on the joke. But it’s hardly a good joke. Is a cliché tax feasible? At $10,000 a throw, paid to his publisher, to support rhyming poets (a suppressed minority), King could have all he wants.

          The right words are all we have in this world, and King too rarely pauses to search for them. He can access a good deal of genuine chrome-wheeled magic as a writer, but he reaches too often for the canned and frozen stuff, for the dried spices, for word-clusters that fell off the back of a Sysco truck.

          “The Institute” feels antiquated and a bit gamey in other ways. The novel is set in the present day, but potatoes are “spuds,” coffee is “joe,” food is “chow,” mosquitoes are “skeeters” and a doctor is “the local sawbones.” You may start to feel you’re in a ’50s-era cartoon strip, that you’re locked inside “Beetle Bailey.”

          This novel is less a motorcycle than a double-decker bus, but it does handle gracefully. The plot never stalls. There’s a fervent anti-Trump streak. And King still really knows what to do when he gets his characters out on the road.
          Twitter: https://twitter.com/ron_clinton

          Comment


            #35
            Originally posted by RonClinton View Post
            “The Institute” feels antiquated and a bit gamey in other ways. The novel is set in the present day, but potatoes are “spuds,” coffee is “joe,” food is “chow,” mosquitoes are “skeeters” and a doctor is “the local sawbones.” You may start to feel you’re in a ’50s-era cartoon strip, that you’re locked inside “Beetle Bailey.”
            This complaint doesn't make sense to me. This just sounds like a New York reviewer who hasn't been anywhere else who thinks everyone talks the way New Yorkers talk. I haven't read The Institute yet, but there are certainly places in the country that talk like this. Specifically small town / rural America, and SK likes to set his books in those kinds of places.

            Also if I kinda feel like if someone doesn't like SK writing anti Trump / anti Republican stuff they should probably stop reading him, because I don't think he's ever gonna stop including those themes.
            CD Email: danhocker@cemeterydance.com

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              #36
              I agree with both points. As I've stated elsewhere social commentary is fine and expected but straight up bashing is when I have to set a book down.

              Either way I will buy the book, read it or try to, and stick it on the shelf. Truly hope it is a great read.

              Originally posted by Dan Hocker View Post
              This complaint doesn't make sense to me. This just sounds like a New York reviewer who hasn't been anywhere else who thinks everyone talks the way New Yorkers talk. I haven't read The Institute yet, but there are certainly places in the country that talk like this. Specifically small town / rural America, and SK likes to set his books in those kinds of places.

              Also if I kinda feel like if someone doesn't like SK writing anti Trump / anti Republican stuff they should probably stop reading him, because I don't think he's ever gonna stop including those themes.
              Looking for the fonting of youth.

              Comment


                #37
                I am looking forward to this one. I will be reading it by this time tomorrow!

                Comment


                  #38
                  I got through the first two sections today, about 80 pages. So far I am really enjoying it. Much more classic King than his more recent work. It is nearly a 600 page book so it has lots of time to go south but so far I am pleased!

                  Comment


                    #39
                    Read it yesterday. Loved it!

                    Comment


                      #40
                      Originally posted by RonClinton View Post
                      The New York Times didn't much care for THE INSTITUTE (and, yes, I'm cherry-picking the review for the negative portion...but that negative portion essentially makes up half of the review...and, sigh, more Trump hysteria laced within King's narrative):

                      https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/08/b...phen-king.html

                      I read “The Institute” quickly and painlessly and I tried to enjoy myself. That I didn’t is partly a matter of temperament. I generally want to smack a (fictional) kid with special powers. I don’t care about quests or magic or Vulcan mind-melding. Yet I can suspend my predispositions. The right writer can convince me to stick around. King kept me marginally on the hook.

                      “The Institute” buries itself under a self-generating avalanche of clichés. I began to underline them but I had to stop after a while; carpal tunnel is no joke. “Funny as a rubber crutch,” “seeya later, alligator,” “serious as a heart attack,” “none of your beeswax,” “coals to Newcastle,” “touch him with a 10-foot pole,” “not in Kansas anymore,” “go big or go home” — they’re termites, and they collapse this house before it’s even partially up. To be fair to King, he sometimes uses these half-mockingly and is partially in on the joke. But it’s hardly a good joke. Is a cliché tax feasible? At $10,000 a throw, paid to his publisher, to support rhyming poets (a suppressed minority), King could have all he wants.

                      The right words are all we have in this world, and King too rarely pauses to search for them. He can access a good deal of genuine chrome-wheeled magic as a writer, but he reaches too often for the canned and frozen stuff, for the dried spices, for word-clusters that fell off the back of a Sysco truck.

                      “The Institute” feels antiquated and a bit gamey in other ways. The novel is set in the present day, but potatoes are “spuds,” coffee is “joe,” food is “chow,” mosquitoes are “skeeters” and a doctor is “the local sawbones.” You may start to feel you’re in a ’50s-era cartoon strip, that you’re locked inside “Beetle Bailey.”

                      This novel is less a motorcycle than a double-decker bus, but it does handle gracefully. The plot never stalls. There’s a fervent anti-Trump streak. And King still really knows what to do when he gets his characters out on the road.
                      I am at the halfway point in the book and so far I am convinced the review quoted is for a different book. Nothing stated in the review has transpired yet. Things may change but I am really enjoying the story. A story which in no way is mentioned in the portions of the review listed here.

                      Comment


                        #41
                        Are you reading or listening, Martin?

                        Comment


                          #42
                          Originally posted by Brian861 View Post
                          They're at it again:

                          The Institute variants
                          That link didn't work - who is selling the variants?

                          Comment


                            #43
                            Originally posted by Brian861 View Post
                            Are you reading or listening, Martin?
                            A little of both. I am listening to the Audible version when driving and reading the Hardback when home. The narrator is just ok for me.

                            Comment


                              #44
                              Originally posted by Martin View Post
                              A little of both. I am listening to the Audible version when driving and reading the Hardback when home. The narrator is just ok for me.
                              Ugh. I'll be listening to it next. Hopefully that narrator doesn't blow for me.

                              Comment


                                #45
                                What is the consensus on the book so far?

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