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Thread: Blogging All About It

  1. #21
    Senior Member Inmate RichardThomas's Avatar
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    haven't been to WHC or Necon, might hit Bouchercon in St. Louis later this year - you're all welcome to come to Chicago for AWP next year (probably too literary for most)

  2. #22
    Senior Member Involuntarily Committed RJHubbard53's Avatar
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    Gah, you all are depressing me talking about your finances or lacktherof. I would really like to be a writer, just as much as i wanted to be an archaeologist - they have something in common - neither seem to be financially lucrative unless you're King, Koontz, Stein, or Brown. I like my boat, ipads, TVs, cars, vacations, and delicious food. I don't really want to go back to milk and kidney beans. Perhaps its better to write as a hobby; If I had to really depend on it, it wouldn't be any fun...

    Back on topic, I plan to make it to neon one of these days; seems fun
    It ain't braggin' if you can do it. . .

  3. #23
    Senior Member Hearing Voices ozmosis7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RJHubbard53 View Post
    Gah, you all are depressing me talking about your finances or lacktherof.
    There are many writers out there able to make a living out of it. You just need a little luck to get there...and some talent I'd reckon . But it can be had. One of the most valuable things I have learned along my path is that colleagues are colleagues, so you shouldn't expect them to become fans. If they become a fan, that is fabulous, but they are more likely to be supportive of your initial struggle at least, as you should theirs. If you focus on the group that truly comprises a fan base I think you'll be better off in the long run. That base of people is much harder to round up though. The Cons are a great place to start though.

  4. #24
    Administrator Totally Insane Dan Hocker's Avatar
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    I'm no writer, but with my few experiences in the field. The biggest key to making a living at writing, is learning to write what sells. Sadly what sells is not always what everyone wants to write. Also, what sells can be very hard in the horror field, especially if you are trying to sell your stuff to the New York publishers. They are harsh critics, that don't buy a lot of horror.
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  5. #25
    Senior Member Involuntarily Committed RJHubbard53's Avatar
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    ah i get it! So what Dan's saying is that i need to write a story about Preston Picadilly, a kid wizard while on a Vatican fieldtrip, encounters an albino medium who tells him about some evil of the Catholic Church invovling universe-hopping gunslingers and an insightful golden retriever... is that right, Dan?
    It ain't braggin' if you can do it. . .

  6. #26
    Senior Member 2nd Rubber Room Confinement peteOcha's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RJHubbard53 View Post
    ah i get it! So what Dan's saying is that i need to write a story about Preston Picadilly, a kid wizard while on a Vatican fieldtrip, encounters an albino medium who tells him about some evil of the Catholic Church invovling universe-hopping gunslingers and an insightful golden retriever... is that right, Dan?
    Actually... You could be on to something there...

  7. #27
    Senior Member Inmate RichardThomas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Hocker View Post
    I'm no writer, but with my few experiences in the field. The biggest key to making a living at writing, is learning to write what sells. Sadly what sells is not always what everyone wants to write. Also, what sells can be very hard in the horror field, especially if you are trying to sell your stuff to the New York publishers. They are harsh critics, that don't buy a lot of horror.
    well, kind of true - if you look at the NYT bestseller lists, who is on there? horror, fantasy, SF, mystery, romance and YA - there is SOME literary fiction, but most of it doesn't sell really well compared to the genre fiction writers

    http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/b...m-the-top.html

    take the link above (some of these i'm guessing on genres or using broad strokes)
    - you've got dan brown (thriller), john grisham (legal thrillers), stephen king (horror/thrillers), james patterson (mystery), janet evanovich (mystery), stephanie meyer (horror)

    cornwell, crichton, grafton - if anything we should be learning to write mysteries

    that's partly why i'm trying to diversify - i write horror, noir/neo-noir, crime, thrillers, fantasy, SF, and literary - the only genres i don't write are romance and YA, really

    new york is funny, they love literary fiction, but it's not the best selling genre at ALL - some of the big names (again) do well, Franzen just had Freedom out - believe me, as i get my MFA i'm sending work out to both literary journals that most of you have probably never heard of, but i'm also hitting the big names in horror and noir

    if you write dark, sometimes a little tweak in one direction can change what genre or sub-genre they put you in

  8. #28
    Administrator Totally Insane Dan Hocker's Avatar
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    I wasn't necessarily referring to "literary fiction". Mostly just referring to horror in general. It's a very tough field when it comes to the NY publishers, in general there are a lot more writers that make a living at it, in the other genre's than there are in the horror genre, and that's because horror is a tough genre to sell. I forget how Brian put it to me awhile ago, but basically what he was saying is that NY publishers don't really care a lot about the horror genre, but the small press is the champion of it.
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  9. #29
    Senior Member Inmate RichardThomas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Hocker View Post
    I wasn't necessarily referring to "literary fiction". Mostly just referring to horror in general. It's a very tough field when it comes to the NY publishers, in general there are a lot more writers that make a living at it, in the other genre's than there are in the horror genre, and that's because horror is a tough genre to sell. I forget how Brian put it to me awhile ago, but basically what he was saying is that NY publishers don't really care a lot about the horror genre, but the small press is the champion of it.
    true, horror does have trouble in NYC unless you're named King or Straub or Koontz - small presses, thank god for them

  10. #30
    Junior Member Visitor onipar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichardThomas View Post
    true, horror does have trouble in NYC unless you're named King or Straub or Koontz - small presses, thank god for them
    True. If it wasn't for Bad Moon Books, I'm not sure my first novel would have ever seen light. It's a bit too...different.

    On topic, I add new blog posts all the time. My current post is just some humor related to "blog awards." I'm also trying to start a new segment called "Ask the Professor" in which readers send me writing related questions, and I may even answer them in between the insults and sarcasm. Another segment I do is something called "Sunshine Says." It's basically a picture of a human skull (Sunshine) with a funny one-liner. Sometimes I use Zed (a stuffed Zombie).

  11. #31
    Senior Member Involuntarily Committed Draven Ames's Avatar
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    If you want, you can check out the phone interview I did with Michael Marano, author of Stories from the Plague Years - published by Cemetery Dance.

    http://dravenames.blogspot.com/2011/...el-marano.html

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Draven Ames View Post
    If you want, you can check out the phone interview I did with Michael Marano, author of Stories from the Plague Years - published by Cemetery Dance.

    http://dravenames.blogspot.com/2011/...el-marano.html

    Draven, very cool interview, you asked some good questions. A beautiful book, too. The artwork is amazing.

  13. #33
    Senior Member Involuntarily Committed Draven Ames's Avatar
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    Thanks for stopping by to read it, JJ. I'm sure Michael will appreciate the read as well. Keeping it up for a week so people can check it out and hopefully check out his book. He is very intelligent. It was moderately intimidating.

  14. #34
    Senior Member Involuntarily Committed Nik Houser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Hocker View Post
    I'm no writer, but with my few experiences in the field. The biggest key to making a living at writing, is learning to write what sells. Sadly what sells is not always what everyone wants to write. Also, what sells can be very hard in the horror field, especially if you are trying to sell your stuff to the New York publishers. They are harsh critics, that don't buy a lot of horror.
    My feeling is that most horror writers' style is too idiosyncratic to genre fiction to penetrate the mainstream market. I'm not saying their writing isn't good. Far from it. It's GREAT. But it's not typically told with the kind of voice that appeals to non-horror fans. I think it takes a very specific combination of idea, tone, and most especially voice to make that leap from the horror fans to the larger markets. I think the same is true for sci-fi, as well. Take two of my favorite sci-fi writers: someone like Scalzi almost has it. He's got NYTimes bestsellers, but that's still mostly because enough sci-fi fans pick up his stuff, not because it really crosses over to the mainstream. Now take Paolo Bacigalupi, who's brilliant and has won a zillion awards is a very early career. He's in a class of his own, I think, and yet he doesn't write with that mainstream voice. So yeah, he sells and makes a living from his writing, but he doesn't SELL. This is NOT a criticism in any regard. Merely an opinion based on my own observations. Personally, I love idiosyncratic writing. And I love horror. And I thank the small presses of the world for championing both!

  15. #35
    Senior Member Involuntarily Committed Draven Ames's Avatar
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    I believe you have something there, Nik. I think voice is very important.

  16. #36
    Senior Member Involuntarily Committed Draven Ames's Avatar
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    Just posted an interview with Simon Wood. I'm reading his book, Paying the Piper, now. I read his book, Fall Guy, earlier and liked it a lot. He used to race cars before writing and doing PI work. Interesting guy.

  17. #37
    Senior Member Hearing Voices ozmosis7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Draven Ames View Post
    Just posted an interview with Simon Wood. I'm reading his book, Paying the Piper, now. I read his book, Fall Guy, earlier and liked it a lot. He used to race cars before writing and doing PI work. Interesting guy.
    Is he the guy that the TV was based on?

  18. #38
    Member Displaying Erratic Behaviour
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    Quote Originally Posted by Draven Ames View Post
    Just posted an interview with Simon Wood. I'm reading his book, Paying the Piper, now. I read his book, Fall Guy, earlier and liked it a lot. He used to race cars before writing and doing PI work. Interesting guy.

    Dang it, Draven, I'm going to have to put your blog on my regular go-to list.

  19. #39
    Member Displaying Erratic Behaviour hamount's Avatar
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    I started a blog, where I review novels, the first one I posted was last Monday about The Husband by Dean Koontz. If you want to check it out the URl is in my signature. If you have any suggestions about books you'd like to see reviewed in my blog leave a comment on my blog and I'll look into it. Hope you enjoy my opinions, it seems I've suddenly taken an interest in journalism, and no better way than a blog to get started. Opinions about my blog, and suggestions are welcomed.
    Last edited by hamount; 08-20-2011 at 01:17 AM.
    www.weeklynovelreview.blogspot.com Every Monday I review and critique a different novel.

  20. #40
    Senior Member Hearing Voices ozmosis7's Avatar
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    Up to 30k words on "The Dead Civil War" project. Its only a rough draft, but its up there to read if anyone is interested. Still a lot of story to go though.

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