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Thread: What are you currently reading?

  1. #4081
    Senior Member Lobotomized Martin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dannyboy121070 View Post
    I'm reading UNBROKEN, which is a great book, but has been dragging a bit for me as I near the home stretch.....it is an endless catalog of misery. Louie Zamperini had one hell of a series of misfortunes plague his life.
    Also reading MODERN MASTERS: MIKE PLOOG, about one of my favorite comic-book/storyboard artists, and the new JUSTICE LEAGUE DARK, VOL. 1.
    I will read Unbroken eventually.

  2. #4082
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    Finished INSPECTION by Josh Malerman, then read/competed CONTAGION by Erin Bowman. Currently reading DESCENDANT by Graham Masterton. I know, what is up with these one word titles.

    Next up THE LAST by Hanna Jameson.

    Jim

  3. #4083
    Senior Member 1st Rubber Room Confinement mhatchett's Avatar
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    I just finished up Snakewood by Adrian Selby. I would recommend it though it's not your standard S&F novel and the beginning is a bit dense. It finishes strong and introduced a lot of interesting elements, just don't look for many real good guys in this one. Up next a mystery by Chris Knopf, The Last Refuge.

  4. #4084
    Senior Member Hearing Voices
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    Just read Bradbury's SOMEWHERE A BAND IS PLAYING (Gauntlet S/L HC), and while I appreciate Gauntlet's on-going goal to offer unpublished material and rough snippets of unfinished to his fans, some of that material probably should have stayed in the proverbial trunk...this was one of those efforts. As a Bradbury fan, it was an interesting book as it showed the progression of the pieces, the alternate truncated fits and starts, etc., but as just a piece of fiction, it contained just about every Bradburyesque excess of sentimental prose, and, worse, wasn't particularly interesting and didn't make a great deal of sense in spots. This needed a lot more polish and work before it should have seen print...reminded me a bit of the later Matheson stuff Gauntlet published, material that did little to further Matheson's body of work's reputation and, in fact, arguably diminished it. I understand the financial and artisitic/cultural/completist motivation to put out material posthumously and/or in their twilight years when they no longer have the ability to write new fiction (and Bradbury and Matheson are far, far from the only ones who've had this happen), and I understand such material should not be compared to their classic work and instead should be accepted for what it is...but it's still unfortunate when that new material doesn't reflect the quality for which they're known and, for some readers, puts a bit of a tarnish on that work. Rough, uneven work is expected in a writer's early years, but should a writer and/or his audience find worth in its publication at the end of his career? Harper Lee's GO SET A WATCHMAN is another example, though as I understand it this was a money-grab by people who ignored her decades-long refusal to release any new work.

  5. #4085
    Senior Member Lobotomized Martin's Avatar
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    Reading Tim Lebbon's 'The Silence' before it hits Netflix. Enjoying it so far. Has a classic horror vibe to me.
    Last edited by Martin; 04-09-2019 at 10:57 PM.

  6. #4086
    Senior Member 1st Rubber Room Confinement mhatchett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonClinton View Post
    Just read Bradbury's SOMEWHERE A BAND IS PLAYING (Gauntlet S/L HC), and while I appreciate Gauntlet's on-going goal to offer unpublished material and rough snippets of unfinished to his fans, some of that material probably should have stayed in the proverbial trunk...this was one of those efforts. As a Bradbury fan, it was an interesting book as it showed the progression of the pieces, the alternate truncated fits and starts, etc., but as just a piece of fiction, it contained just about every Bradburyesque excess of sentimental prose, and, worse, wasn't particularly interesting and didn't make a great deal of sense in spots. This needed a lot more polish and work before it should have seen print...reminded me a bit of the later Matheson stuff Gauntlet published, material that did little to further Matheson's body of work's reputation and, in fact, arguably diminished it. I understand the financial and artisitic/cultural/completist motivation to put out material posthumously and/or in their twilight years when they no longer have the ability to write new fiction (and Bradbury and Matheson are far, far from the only ones who've had this happen), and I understand such material should not be compared to their classic work and instead should be accepted for what it is...but it's still unfortunate when that new material doesn't reflect the quality for which they're known and, for some readers, puts a bit of a tarnish on that work. Rough, uneven work is expected in a writer's early years, but should a writer and/or his audience find worth in its publication at the end of his career? Harper Lee's GO SET A WATCHMAN is another example, though as I understand it this was a money-grab by people who ignored her decades-long refusal to release any new work.
    I agree Ron, a lot of money grabs, which I don't mind if it is a good product. I love Bradbury, but you know he was the ultimate revisionist, he didn't do a re-write that he wasn't convinced eclipsed the original and I hate that. Not being a completist myself, I find it pretty easy to draw the line.

  7. #4087
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    Four hundred pages into The City of Mirrors and really enjoying it. There was a lengthy backstory in the first third of the book that was, first time in the trilogy, the first time I was somewhat bored with the story. But, you come to realize that that backstory was the genesis for the entire Passage story; just wished that Cronin could have speed it up a bit. But, otherwise, City of Mirrors, similar to the first two books, is kicking ass. Can't wait to see what the final 200 pages have in story. Overall, will be sorry to see this one come to an end.

    B

  8. #4088
    Senior Member Hearing Voices Ben Staad's Avatar
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    I have to admit I didn't read this yet. By the time I received my copy I would have had to do a re-read on the other two and I just never got around to it. Thanks for the mini review.

    Quote Originally Posted by brlesh View Post
    Four hundred pages into The City of Mirrors and really enjoying it. There was a lengthy backstory in the first third of the book that was, first time in the trilogy, the first time I was somewhat bored with the story. But, you come to realize that that backstory was the genesis for the entire Passage story; just wished that Cronin could have speed it up a bit. But, otherwise, City of Mirrors, similar to the first two books, is kicking ass. Can't wait to see what the final 200 pages have in story. Overall, will be sorry to see this one come to an end.

    B

  9. #4089
    Administrator Totally Insane Dan Hocker's Avatar
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    Anyone else read the series of books the TV show "The Expanse" is based on (also called The Expanse)? I'm really enjoying them so far. Though the further in I get the more I realize that the books did a much better job of telling the story that the show did. The show changed a lot of the fundamental either character traits of the main characters and the different political organizations. I really think the books version of those things has been much better.
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  10. #4090
    Senior Member 1st Electroshock Session bsaenz24's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Hocker View Post
    Anyone else read the series of books the TV show "The Expanse" is based on (also called The Expanse)? I'm really enjoying them so far. Though the further in I get the more I realize that the books did a much better job of telling the story that the show did. The show changed a lot of the fundamental either character traits of the main characters and the different political organizations. I really think the books version of those things has been much better.
    Waiting for book 9 and then I'll start.

  11. #4091
    Senior Member Involuntarily Committed njhorror's Avatar
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    Reading the second in the Merrily Watkins series by Phil Rickman, Midwinter of the Spirit.

    The first, The Wine of Angels, was typical Rickman, a great read from cover to cover.
    Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

  12. #4092
    Senior Member 1st Rubber Room Confinement mhatchett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Hocker View Post
    Anyone else read the series of books the TV show "The Expanse" is based on (also called The Expanse)? I'm really enjoying them so far. Though the further in I get the more I realize that the books did a much better job of telling the story that the show did. The show changed a lot of the fundamental either character traits of the main characters and the different political organizations. I really think the books version of those things has been much better.
    I read the books and enjoy the show. I pretty much compartmentalize each and try to enjoy them as two similar, but slightly different things, if that makes sense at all lol!!! The books are just wow, I can't believe they haven't won more awards. One of my best buys from Sub Press for sure.

  13. #4093
    Administrator Totally Insane Dan Hocker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhatchett View Post
    I read the books and enjoy the show. I pretty much compartmentalize each and try to enjoy them as two similar, but slightly different things, if that makes sense at all lol!!! The books are just wow, I can't believe they haven't won more awards. One of my best buys from Sub Press for sure.
    Generally I compartmentalize those things as well, but reading through the books now, it just seems like the show made some strange choices with some of the changes that they made.
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  14. #4094
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    Quote Originally Posted by njhorror View Post
    Reading the second in the Merrily Watkins series by Phil Rickman, Midwinter of the Spirit.

    The first, The Wine of Angels, was typical Rickman, a great read from cover to cover.
    I'm gonna have to check these books out. I remember Tyree raving about the BBC adaptation of MIDWINTER, and I just read about it in WE DON'T GO BACK, a phenomenal book about Folk Horror. Thanks for the reminder, NJ.

  15. #4095
    Senior Member Involuntarily Committed njhorror's Avatar
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    Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

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  17. #4097
    Senior Member Jeez! Don't you have anything better to do with your time? bookworm 1's Avatar
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    Reading A House at the Bottom of a Lake by Josh Malerman. Short but not sweet. I will finish it however for a novella that's just over 100 pages it seems that with repeating things less this could be a great story and 20 pages less.
    After I finish it I will be doing a long overdue re-read of Psycho by Robert Bloch.

  18. #4098
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    Just Finished reading Josh Malerman’s “Inspection”. I really liked it, but didn’t love it. I’ve read a ton of horror/sci-fi and don’t recall ever reading a story quite like this one. Very unique and highly original idea. Do wish some of the characters beyond the main protagonists would have been more fleshed out. I also would have liked more information about the Parenthood and its’ goals. The front half of the book was a bit slow; however, the back half of the book more than makes up for it. Overall, another fun read from Malerman and a book I would recommend. I am now beginning the Subterranean Press limited edition of CJ Tudor’s “The Chalk Man”. Haven’t ready anything by this author yet but have heard good things.

  19. #4099
    Senior Member Jeez! Don't you have anything better to do with your time? bookworm 1's Avatar
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    Chalk Man was one of my favorite books from last year. I'm waiting g on Cemetery Dance to get their copies as I ordered through them.
    The way you feel about inspection is how I felt about Unbury Carol. Fun story but I oh a couple of characters I cared about.
    I finished up House at the Bottom of a Lake and it was a 3 star read. I loved the 2 main characters but hated the house.This he ending did get to me.
    I also finished Psycho and loved it more then the first time.
    Now I'm reading The Nightmare Girl by Jonathan Janz. He is quickly becoming for me what Josh Malerman has become to Jeff. An author I have to own and read everything he puts out.

  20. #4100
    Senior Member Lobotomized Martin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bookworm 1 View Post
    Chalk Man was one of my favorite books from last year. I'm waiting g on Cemetery Dance to get their copies as I ordered through them.
    The way you feel about inspection is how I felt about Unbury Carol. Fun story but I oh a couple of characters I cared about.
    I finished up House at the Bottom of a Lake and it was a 3 star read. I loved the 2 main characters but hated the house.This he ending did get to me.
    I also finished Psycho and loved it more then the first time.
    Now I'm reading The Nightmare Girl by Jonathan Janz. He is quickly becoming for me what Josh Malerman has become to Jeff. An author I have to own and read everything he puts out.
    I have to try Janz again. I read his first novel and it showed real potential but also had some weak spots.

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