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Thread: October - How many??

  1. #1
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    October - How many??

    I finished 5 in October.

    It by Stephen King. The first time I've read It in 30+ years and I liked it more today than upon the original reading. It is an incredible bit of story telling that has earned its place as a horror classic. Definitely moves up on my personal list of King's favorites. 5 / 5

    Black Bequeanthments by Simon Strantzas was a chapbook from Dim Shores Press advertised as a Lovecraftian-noir, but the story had too little of either genre to be very effective. 2.5 / 5

    The Valancourt Book of Horror Stories Vol. 2 is an anthology of little know horror stories ranging from the late 1890's to the present day (the unpublished 'Boys Who Wouldn't Wake Up', a modern ghost story by Stephen Gregory & the highlight of the anthology in my opinion). These stories leaned to the more subtle end of the genre, so if you are into quiet horror this anthology is for you. Splatter punks will be bored by this collection of subtle horror stories. 4 / 5

    The Island of Dr. Moreau by HG Wells is my favorite of Wells' classic SF/Horror stories. The story of a vivisectionist trying to turn animals into men is a direct descendant from Shelley's Frankenstein. 5 / 5

    Ghost Stories: Classic Tales of Horror & Suspense ed. by Lisa Morton & Leslie Klinger was an anthology of Victorian ghost stories from the early 1800's to the early 1900's. It included both well known ('Ligeia' by EAP, 'The Signalman' by Charles Dickens & "Whistle and I'll Come to You My Lad' by MR James) and more obscure stories. My favorites of those stories new to me include 'The Lady's Maid's Bell' by Edith Wharton, in which a recovering young maid goes to help care for a sickly lady in an abusive marriage & 'The Substitue' by Georgia Wood Pangborn, in which a woman pays a visit to a well-to-do, childless friend from college. 3.5 / 5

    B

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    Senior Member 1st Rubber Room Confinement jeffingoff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brlesh View Post
    I finished 5 in October.

    It by Stephen King. The first time I've read It in 30+ years and I liked it more today than upon the original reading. It is an incredible bit of story telling that has earned its place as a horror classic. Definitely moves up on my personal list of King's favorites. 5 / 5

    Black Bequeanthments by Simon Strantzas was a chapbook from Dim Shores Press advertised as a Lovecraftian-noir, but the story had too little of either genre to be very effective. 2.5 / 5

    The Valancourt Book of Horror Stories Vol. 2 is an anthology of little know horror stories ranging from the late 1890's to the present day (the unpublished 'Boys Who Wouldn't Wake Up', a modern ghost story by Stephen Gregory & the highlight of the anthology in my opinion). These stories leaned to the more subtle end of the genre, so if you are into quiet horror this anthology is for you. Splatter punks will be bored by this collection of subtle horror stories. 4 / 5

    The Island of Dr. Moreau by HG Wells is my favorite of Wells' classic SF/Horror stories. The story of a vivisectionist trying to turn animals into men is a direct descendant from Shelley's Frankenstein. 5 / 5

    Ghost Stories: Classic Tales of Horror & Suspense ed. by Lisa Morton & Leslie Klinger was an anthology of Victorian ghost stories from the early 1800's to the early 1900's. It included both well known ('Ligeia' by EAP, 'The Signalman' by Charles Dickens & "Whistle and I'll Come to You My Lad' by MR James) and more obscure stories. My favorites of those stories new to me include 'The Lady's Maid's Bell' by Edith Wharton, in which a recovering young maid goes to help care for a sickly lady in an abusive marriage & 'The Substitue' by Georgia Wood Pangborn, in which a woman pays a visit to a well-to-do, childless friend from college. 3.5 / 5

    B
    You had a great month! So many of those stories intrigue me. I really should read more gothic horror. Have you read Henry James' Turn of the Screw? Brilliant story.

    The only Wells I've ever read was The Time Machine and I talk about the Elon/Morlock evolution all the time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by brlesh View Post

    Black Bequeanthments by Simon Strantzas was a chapbook from Dim Shores Press advertised as a Lovecraftian-noir, but the story had too little of either genre to be very effective. 2.5 / 5
    I gave this one a lot of thought — too much, frankly, for a cheap chapbook — but ultimately wavered too long and missed out. Once I couldn’t get it, then of course I wanted it...so am somewhat comforted to hear it wasn’t quite the experience I was anticipating it’d be. Sorry for your disappointment, though.

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    Senior Member Jeez! Don't you have anything better to do with your time? Martin's Avatar
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    11 Reads this month.

    The Girl on the Porch by Richard Chizmar:
    This novella does exactly what a novella should do. Grabs your attention from the start and never lets up. Mr. Chizmar spins a fascinating mystery as the as the identity and circumstances of the girl on the porch camera unfolds.
    Five Stars

    Full Throttle by Joe Hill:
    Second time reading this book. First, I read the ARC and this time I listened to the audio. The stories range from really good to fantastic!
    Five Stars

    Seed by Ania Ahlborn:
    Chose to follow up on Brother with Seed. An enjoyable read but not as good as Brother.
    Three Stars

    Carmilla: A Vampyre Tale by J.Sheridan Le Fanu:
    I have read the book several years ago. Audible had a special on an audio play presentation of the book so I decided it was time for a re-read.
    Three Stars

    Christopher Cotton Makes The Grade By Jason Sechrest:
    Another solid short story from Patreon.
    Four Stars

    My Lost Family by Danny Ben-Moshe and Dasha Lisitina:
    This is an audible original chronicling a story about a man who learns his mother had two children before he was born. It follows the discovery of the reason for the separation as well as the reunion. A very intriguing story.
    Five Stars

    The Wind Through the Keyhole by Stephen King:
    This is only one of two King novels I had not yet read. To be honest I found this one rather boring.
    Two Stars

    Pines (Wayward Pines #1) by Blake Crouch:
    Been hearing great things about Blake Crouch and the Wayward Pines trilogy so I decided to jump in. While each book stands alone, they form a nice full story. Overall, I really enjoyed this but there are plot holes large enough to drive a truck through. I will be reading more from this author.
    Four Stars

    Wayward (Wayward Pines #2) by Blake Crouch:
    Four Stars

    The Last Town (Wayward Pines #3) by Blake Crouch:
    Four Stars

    War of the Worlds by H.G.Wells and adapted by Orson Welles/Mercury Theatre:
    My annual Halloween listen.
    Five Stars

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffingoff View Post
    You had a great month! So many of those stories intrigue me. I really should read more gothic horror. Have you read Henry James' Turn of the Screw? Brilliant story.

    The only Wells I've ever read was The Time Machine and I talk about the Elon/Morlock evolution all the time.
    Hey Jeff,

    Yes, it was a good month for reading. After spending most of September working through IT (time well spent) I was ready to read some shorter works.

    The Valancourt Book of Horror Stories is a good selection if you are looking for something in the gothic vein. I've read the first 2 and have enjoyed them both. I believe they published a third last year. Need to pick that one up.

    Valancourt also has a series of Victorian Christmas ghost stories. These are stories that were all published in the 1800's and have a definite gothic feel to them. I've read and enjoyed the first 2 (again, I believe they published a third in the series). Not all of the stories have a Christmas theme to them. They were just ghost stories that were published around Christmas time. Apparently back in the 1800's it was a tradition to tell ghost stories at Christmas.

    I haven't read 'Turn of the Screw" yet and I need to. I believe it is in the B&N Classic Ghost Stories anthology, which I have on a shelf somewhere. One of the reason I haven't read it yet is what I have read by James either falls into the "that was OK" category ('Sir Edmund Ormond' & 'Romance of Certain Old Clothes' to "that bored the shit out of me" category ('The Jolly Corner'). To say that James can be wordy is the understatement of the year! One of his stories was in Ghost Stories: Classic Tales of Horror & Suspense. 'The Real Right Thing', which fell into the OK category.

    The Time Machine is great, as is War of the Worlds, but my favorite by Wells has always been Dr. Moreau. Works just as well as a horror story or as a science fiction story. You should give it a try sometime. It is really a borderline novella to short novel, not something that you will need to invest a lot of time into.

    B.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RonClinton View Post
    I gave this one a lot of thought — too much, frankly, for a cheap chapbook — but ultimately wavered too long and missed out. Once I couldn’t get it, then of course I wanted it...so am somewhat comforted to hear it wasn’t quite the experience I was anticipating it’d be. Sorry for your disappointment, though.
    Ron,

    I was expecting more from this story than it delivered. This is the second thing by Strantzas that disappointed me. Earlier this year I tried to read one of his collections (I can't remember the name off the top of my head, it was his recent collection from Undertow (??) Publications) and gave up after 3 or 4 stories. Previous to that I've liked most of what I've read by Strantzas, usually coming across it in various Lovecraft themed anthologies.

    B

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    Martin,

    Good to see your high opinion of both Girl on the Porch & Full Throttle. Have both on my TBR pile.

    B

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    Senior Member Jeez! Don't you have anything better to do with your time? Martin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brlesh View Post
    Martin,

    Good to see your high opinion of both Girl on the Porch & Full Throttle. Have both on my TBR pile.

    B
    Both are books I will re-read.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin View Post

    Pines (Wayward Pines #1) by Blake Crouch:
    Been hearing great things about Blake Crouch and the Wayward Pines trilogy so I decided to jump in. While each book stands alone, they form a nice full story. Overall, I really enjoyed this but there are plot holes large enough to drive a truck through. I will be reading more from this author.
    Four Stars

    Wayward (Wayward Pines #2) by Blake Crouch:
    Four Stars
    Book 1 was a horror/sci-fi/weird hybrid that I really enjoyed...it's probably my favorite of the trilogy. The second book was more of a dark mystery, and the third was a horror/adventure/survival-thriller (which was a great way to end this very compelling series). I think you're probably right at giving the first one 4 stars...I'd say Book 2 was 3 stars and the third 3.5 stars. That said, though (and I realize the averaged rating of the three books doesn't come to four stars), I'd give the trilogy as a whole a 4-star rating.
    Last edited by RonClinton; 11-12-2019 at 07:08 PM.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Jeez! Don't you have anything better to do with your time? Martin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonClinton View Post
    Book 1 was a horror/sci-fi/weird hybrid that I really enjoyed...it's probably my favorite of the trilogy. The second book was more of a dark mystery, and the third was a horror/adventure/survival-thriller (which was a great way to end this very compelling series). I think you're probably right at giving the first one 4 stars...I'd say Book 2 was 3 stars and the third 3.5 stars. That said, though (and I realize the averaged rating of the three books doesn't come to four stars), I'd give the trilogy as a whole a 4-star rating.
    I read them back to back so I probably rated them as a single story. I agree that the second was the weakest. The final book started out as a bit of a slog to me but I really enjoyed the final section. I am considering Dark Matter for my next Crouch read.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin View Post
    I read them back to back so I probably rated them as a single story. I agree that the second was the weakest. The final book started out as a bit of a slog to me but I really enjoyed the final section. I am considering Dark Matter for my next Crouch read.
    I really dug DARK MATTER. His follow-up (and I use that term because there is some echoing of themes), RECURSION, was also good, if a bit (albeit necessarily) repetitive, but I did enjoy DARK MATTER more. Even his earlier novels are pretty good, with probably RUN as the best of the bunch.

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    Senior Member Jeez! Don't you have anything better to do with your time? Martin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonClinton View Post
    I really dug DARK MATTER. His follow-up (and I use that term because there is some echoing of themes), RECURSION, was also good, if a bit (albeit necessarily) repetitive, but I did enjoy DARK MATTER more. Even his earlier novels are pretty good, with probably RUN as the best of the bunch.
    I will have to look at RUN to see if it interests me. I am close to committed to DARK MATTER next.

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