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Thread: The Shining (in all its publication forms)

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    Senior Member 2nd Rubber Room Confinement Theli's Avatar
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    The Shining (in all its publication forms)

    We've been discussing the different editions that The Shining has been issued recently in Daninsky's collection thread (link below), which is not really the place for it.

    http://forum.cemeterydance.com/showt...3226#post83226

    I'd also mentioned on the previous page about Centipede Press's prospective edition of The Shining, suggested prior to the Subterranean Press edition was announced. However due to a difference in opinions or goals, Jerad at CP and Stephen King did not come to an agreement one how to proceed and the proposed edition was axed.

    For those interested in the CP The Shining prelims, check here:

    http://www.thedarktower.org/palaver/...ver-Seen/page5

    and here:

    http://www.thedarktower.org/palaver/...ver-Seen/page7

    Scroll down a bit.

    Continuing the conversation where we left off; what are the merits/demerits of each edition?

    I'd mentioned the art for each edition being strikingly unique to themselves, which is great since we don't all want to keep buying the same book over and over. I think it's the difference in each of these books that is attracting. Let's start from the first one:

    Subterranean Press Edition:

    Pros:
    This one is loaded with art, small and large. Colour and grey(or blue/grey) scale. I also love the production qualities, top notch quality and oversized binding, the cloth boards for the gift edition were great, and the marbled ones for the signed edition were an extra level of class for an already classy edition. I really liked the slip and traycases for these editions. The thick cloth embossed case for the GE was nice step above the average. Also it is likely to be the only signed limited edition of this work for sale (though technically the Folio has a signed copy).

    Cons:
    I am not as enthused with Vincent Chong's art as others. I like it, I really do, but it lacks an organic feel. It comes across quite cold and digital. The story itself takes place in winter scape, so one could argue that it fits, but I would also argue that the story is about family and needs an organic touch to it. There were some issues with the signed editions marbled boards bleeding onto the traycase. Luckily it was mostly rectified by the addition of an impromptu dust jacket being added, for better or worse.

    Folio Society Edition:

    Pros: I will qualify that I do not own this copy yet. I think this is a very classy looking copy. The simple black cloth boards, the elegant art style from Edward Kinsella, the appropriate fantastic end papers that are perfectly suited for the book. It is also simple without much adornment. For those looking for the book and nothing else, no supplementary materials this would be the best choice. The slight chance of a signed copy is cool, especially it had to be won, however...

    Cons: The inability to buy one, and the fact that they are signed by bookplate kind of separates it from a true s/l edition. It doesn't have anything extras or embellishments (contradicting myself). The slipcase is a bit cheap, better than none, but nothing standout about it. Despite it's uniform style with other Folio editions, they do not specifically look great together on the wall, the colours vary and sizes vary greatly. In other words it lacks uniqueness, but also the uniformed look that makes for great shelf appeal (think the Dark Tower series, Easton books, CDs book collections like the current Double Day years or Signature series).

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    Administrator Totally Insane Dan Hocker's Avatar
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    The only thing I have to add here is mostly about the concept of the "bookplate". While in the collecting world bookplates seem to be looked down on, functionally they really aren't any different than any other signature page in a Signed Limited Edition. Since in 99% of cases the signature page is just a sheet of paper that the author signed and then was bound into a book, where a bookplate (depending on how it's done) is essentially the same thing, except instead of bound into the book, it's been glued onto a page that's bound into the book.

    The only place (where in my opinion) a book plate really brings a slightly different value is when we are talking about a trade edition that's been signed vs a trade edition that has a book plate. In a limited edition functionally there is no difference between a signature page and a bookplate, assuming the book was designed with a bookplate in mind.
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    Senior Member 2nd Rubber Room Confinement Theli's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Hocker View Post
    The only thing I have to add here is mostly about the concept of the "bookplate". While in the collecting world bookplates seem to be looked down on, functionally they really aren't any different than any other signature page in a Signed Limited Edition. Since in 99% of cases the signature page is just a sheet of paper that the author signed and then was bound into a book, where a bookplate (depending on how it's done) is essentially the same thing, except instead of bound into the book, it's been glued onto a page that's bound into the book.

    The only place (where in my opinion) a book plate really brings a slightly different value is when we are talking about a trade edition that's been signed vs a trade edition that has a book plate. In a limited edition functionally there is no difference between a signature page and a bookplate, assuming the book was designed with a bookplate in mind.
    I agree with this to a certain extent. There is a vast difference between affixing a bookplate in a regular edition and saying the book is signed and having a limited bookplate printed an only added to the one edition of the book. However I also would argue that it just feels and looks... cheaper. Especially when the only difference between the editions is the book plate (like in Folio's case). The bound in page feels a bit more exclusive, not anyone can add their own bound in page, almost anyone could add a book plate. That said I still want the signed Folio edition, haha.

  4. #4
    Administrator Totally Insane Dan Hocker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Theli View Post
    I agree with this to a certain extent. There is a vast difference between affixing a bookplate in a regular edition and saying the book is signed and having a limited bookplate printed an only added to the one edition of the book. However I also would argue that it just feels and looks... cheaper. Especially when the only difference between the editions is the book plate (like in Folio's case). The bound in page feels a bit more exclusive, not anyone can add their own bound in page, almost anyone could add a book plate. That said I still want the signed Folio edition, haha.
    I think that's kinda part of the point I was making. Just slapping a bookplate in just any book and calling it a limited edition isn't the same thing as designing a book to specifically have a book plate in it. In that case it isn't functionally any different than a bound in signature sheet. For what it's worth (in most cases) if you're careful anyone could hand tip in a signature page after a book has been bound. It's just mostly annoying / time consuming, which is why it's rarely done.
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    Senior Member Involuntarily Committed St. Troy's Avatar
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    My general feeling, with The Shining as with any book, really, is that a multitude of special/limited editions is a very good thing, as there are many ways to enhance presentation, and multiple tastes can be accommodated (the downside, a financial one, is for those that feel compelled to get them all). My experience thus far is that non-Cemetery Dance presses mainly succeed in making me appreciate Cemetery Dance even more, but that's an oversimplification that suggests that the others don't make significant contributions to the industry, when the truth is that they do.

    As for the various editions of The Shining (none of which I've seen in person; hopefully more owners can chip in with detail etc.):

    Cemetery Dance
    http://www.cemeterydance.com/the-shi...l-edition.html
    I have ordered this but do not have it yet as it has yet to be released.

    The added material (After The Play, Before The Play, and more) presumably makes this the definitive edition of The Shining thus far produced.

    I do have the first two books (Carrie and Salem's Lot) in CD's ongoing Doubleday Years series (info at http://www.cemeterydance.com/carrie-...l-edition.html), which are very nice indeed. Between the quality of these and its product description, I expect this to be incredible. Size is also an issue: I like large books, and this is one (10" x 7")

    Centipede Press
    (Links above in the first post)
    The one that got away.
    Based on CP's Salem's Lot (which I worship despite having never seen in person) and the frustratingly tantalizing bits visible in the links given in this thread's initial post, we can only assume this would have been something very special indeed. As I mentioned above, I like large books, and I believe this was intended to be as huge as SL was (13" x 9").

    Subterranean Press
    http://subterraneanpress.com/the-shining
    An interesting edition.
    I like the cover art (visible at the link above), although it feels a bit Weird Talesy to me (this is not necessarily bad so much as it isn't quite what I'm looking for). The interior artwork (done by the same artist), though, feels completely different to me, with monochromatic, distorted perspective pieces conveying the quiet menace of The Shining's scenes as well as anything I've seen anywhere. This is also a nice size edition, at 11" x 7 1/2" (although I'm not 100% certain of these dimensions; please correct me if this is wrong). Do take a look at this edition if you haven't yet. [For a hoot, check out the original "South Park" artwork that was never used.]

    Folio Society
    http://www.foliosociety.com/book/TSH/the-shining
    I'm willing to bet that there are at least a few of you out there that hadn't heard of The Folio Society prior to the publication of their edition of The Shining. Although they have produced some horror (mainly classics like Dracula and Frankenstein; King was a real reach for them), they cover more general things (biography, history, literature, classics, etc.). For anyone with a broader interest in fine books who hasn't done, I recommend you poke around their website, and also poke around eBay (because, unfortunately, once FS has sold out of an edition, they remove the listing from their site).

    I own a few things of theirs and covet dozens more. I learned of their The Shining on a general bibliophile forum (not here or TDT), and as an FS fan, I was excited and eagerly waited to see what they would do. Unfortunately, they didn't do much: where CD, CP and SP were bold, FS reined it in, and a bit too much so for my liking. While I already knew that FS is typically pretty staid, they haven't been afraid to use bold or strong designs that could be attention-getting while retaining a classic feel and without getting Weird Talesy (as with SP) or darkly gothic (as with CP), but even knowing their style, I was very let down by what they came up with. The cover is a complete wasted opportunity (a wasp? hardly central to the tale. so many ways they could have gone with this even had their goal been to avoid obvious things like images of a hotel, hedges, mallet etc.), and there is only one bit of interior artwork (the party) I've seen that intrigues me, with the rest feeling like a flat collage of washed-out 70s iconography. This is the only edition here that I wouldn't like to own.

    But hey - many fans like it, so if you haven't taken a look, you should do so (especially since FS still has it for sale!). And, at 10" x 6 3/4", this is also a nice size book.
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    Senior Member 2nd Rubber Room Confinement Theli's Avatar
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    Centipede Press Edition:
    This edition never existed, as St. Troy put it, the one that got away. I'm sure it would have been lovely. Potter's art is stunning and dark and looked as though it would have fit the book well. As well as the provenance of Potter himself and his work with King limited editions. I'm sure the size and binding would have been stellar too. I will say this though, as much as I love the CP edition of 'Salem's Lot, the lack of slipcase, and even more so interior art, on the gift edition is a huge disappointment. If you get the whole aftermarket set with the traycase and prints it makes up for it, but I don't know anyone that wouldn't have wanted their copy bound with the art inside. If that happened again with The Shining it would have been a bit of a slap in the face to collectors. Though I think in this case it more had to do with the fact that the GE copy of Lot was a last minute decision due to demand.

    Cemetery Dance Edition:

    Pros:
    I agree that so far it seems the CD edition will be the definitive edition. From the art by a renown artist (for King and otherwise), to the size and quality binding (10x7 will do just fine!), but most importantly the extras. This will be packed with all sorts of goodies never included before. Hell even the shelf appeal, the matching double day years books, or even with previous King limited/gift editions from CD. Yet each has it's own presentation and style.

    Cons: One down side, and it says little about the actual quality of the book, and nor do I personally care, is that they are last to bat, two copies have preceded it. Also not really a downside, but a missed upside would be the lack of a King signed edition. It matters little, but my fantasy edition would be CD's output, plus a signature.

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    Senior Member Receiving Daily Medication
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    Folio Society occasionally reprints their books. They did a second printing of Dune, for example.

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    Senior Member 2nd Rubber Room Confinement Theli's Avatar
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    The Shining is already in its second printing. Any I know of more than one printing of one of their Cantebury Tales editions.

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    Senior Member Involuntarily Committed St. Troy's Avatar
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    Iím not sure if these:

    Quote Originally Posted by slayn666 View Post
    Folio Society occasionally reprints their books. They did a second printing of Dune, for example.
    Quote Originally Posted by Theli View Post
    The Shining is already in its second printing. Any I know of more than one printing of one of their Cantebury Tales editions.
    Öare in response to my comment that:

    Quote Originally Posted by St. Troy View Post
    Öonce FS has sold out of an edition, they remove the listing from their site...
    If so, to clarify: while FS may indeed occasionally reprint (they don't quite operate like the presses typically discussed here), anything they arenít selling is removed from their website. I mentioned this because I wanted anyone interested in checking FS out to understand that many of the works that FS devotees and collectors rave about wonít be found there (whereas a CD newbie can see all kinds of long-gone great stuff on the CD website). For example: the website lists the currently available $695 edition of Canterbury Tales, but not my preferred (and much cheaper) 1986 3-volume edition; also, my outstanding Winston Churchill The Second World War set (do take a gander: http://www.churchillbooks.com/detail...mNumber=200911).

    If not...carry on.
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    Senior Member Hearing Voices Tommy's Avatar
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    The Sub Press cover is for the gift edition. The signed edition was originally released without a dust jacket but so many collectors complained about rubbing on their copies that a dust jacket for it was issued after it was published. There was also an issue with ink/dye bleeding into the traycase and many had to be replaced.

    Here is a pretty good write-up about all that. http://www.stephenkingcollector.com/...d/shining.html

    The South Park cover was quite a debacle.

    Personally, I really liked the FS edition much better in person. Photos don't really do it or the artwork justice.

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    Senior Member 2nd Rubber Room Confinement Theli's Avatar
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    I was replying to slayn666's comment about the reprint, I actually didn't think about your initial comment regarding their printing practices. They definitely release different versions of the same book, Cantebury Tales is a good example as there is at least three different editions from Folio. With that said, I don't think they would be considered a second printing, unless it is directly the same as the print before it. In regards to the Shining, I actually contacted Folio to find out of The Shining was still in its first print, and was informed it was not. So it is the same edition as the first print, but in it's second printing now.


    I remember that debacle Tommy. I also remember the response to The Shining cover art, I think it went through two different artists/covers before settling with Chong, one I suppose being the South Park cover. Do you know where we could see a picture of it?

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    Senior Member Lobotomized Martin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Theli View Post
    I was replying to slayn666's comment about the reprint, I actually didn't think about your initial comment regarding their printing practices. They definitely release different versions of the same book, Cantebury Tales is a good example as there is at least three different editions from Folio. With that said, I don't think they would be considered a second printing, unless it is directly the same as the print before it. In regards to the Shining, I actually contacted Folio to find out of The Shining was still in its first print, and was informed it was not. So it is the same edition as the first print, but in it's second printing now.


    I remember that debacle Tommy. I also remember the response to The Shining cover art, I think it went through two different artists/covers before settling with Chong, one I suppose being the South Park cover. Do you know where we could see a picture of it?
    Gabriel Rodriguez did a cover that many people panned as being to cartoonish. Not sure if this is the one refered to as the South Park cover. Not familiar to the show so I would not understand the reference.

    The_Shining_by_Stephen_King_Cover_Art_Only_270_385.jpg
    Last edited by Martin; 01-19-2017 at 06:06 PM.

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    Administrator Totally Insane Dan Hocker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin View Post
    Gabriel Rodriguez did a cover that many people panned as being to cartoonish. Not sure if this is the one refered to as the South Park cover. Not familiar to the show so I would not understand the reference.

    The_Shining_by_Stephen_King_Cover_Art_Only_270_385.jpg
    I actually really like that cover. Not necessarily the text design (which I assume probably wasn't final), but I really dig the artwork. Doesn't really seem "cartoonish" to me at all. In general though I think most (not all) people in the SK collecting community tend to not like anything new or different. They pretty much want art from the same handful of artists, or at least in that same style.
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    Senior Member Starting to Drool Incessantly Brian861's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Hocker View Post
    I actually really like that cover. Not necessarily the text design (which I assume probably wasn't final), but I really dig the artwork. Doesn't really seem "cartoonish" to me at all. In general though I think most (not all) people in the SK collecting community tend to not like anything new or different. They pretty much want art from the same handful of artists, or at least in that same style.
    I agree, Dan. Sometimes it's nice to see artists step outside the box and collectors in general need to remove sticks from certain orifices. Very good cover art IMO.

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    Senior Member Lobotomized Martin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Hocker View Post
    I actually really like that cover. Not necessarily the text design (which I assume probably wasn't final), but I really dig the artwork. Doesn't really seem "cartoonish" to me at all. In general though I think most (not all) people in the SK collecting community tend to not like anything new or different. They pretty much want art from the same handful of artists, or at least in that same style.
    I agree with you. If I remember correctly people were complaining about the choice of artist before they even saw the first pieces. The main complaint being 'He is a cartoon artist, The Shining deserves a serious artist'.

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    Senior Member 2nd Rubber Room Confinement Theli's Avatar
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    I do remember that now. I also remember saying that I liked it and that it was cool to see Rodriguez working on a King work, especially considering he'd worked with Joe Hill previously. Also worth note is that he did illustrate books before this, and not just comics. He did the illustrations for Peter S. Beagle's The Unicorn Sonatas. The font is garish though, and I think a larger higher resolution image would make the concept art stand out even more.

    As far as art goes for The Shining I do really like the original cover art. I think it is a perfect match for the book. Along with the original 'Salem's Lot I would argue it to be among the best of King's trade editions. Eerie, and haunting with a gothic feel to it, but also a just barely restrained violence.
    Last edited by Theli; 01-19-2017 at 06:53 PM.

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    Senior Member Involuntarily Committed St. Troy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin View Post
    Gabriel Rodriguez did a cover that many people panned as being to cartoonish. Not sure if this is the one refered to as the South Park cover. Not familiar to the show so I would not understand the reference.

    The_Shining_by_Stephen_King_Cover_Art_Only_270_385.jpg
    This is indeed the "South Park" cover; Google "south park kenny" to see what people are getting at.

    I may lack the vocabulary to make myself clear, but as the lone person (in this thread) that doesn't like this cover, perhaps I can explain why (and, in my case, nothing to do with not wanting to see something different; there is a lot of variety in the small/niche press world, but this is the first thing that screamed "cheap cartoon" to me): I too like the suggestion of "barely restrained violence," but the lack of color gradation lent the whole thing a very unreal "construction paper" feel to me, which undercut whatever else the work might have been able to accomplish. Disaster movies sometimes have poor special effects where you can tell that the building being destroyed isn't a building but a model; if you've had that experience, this (for me) is a similar feeling - I feel like I'm looking at a model or toy, not an illustration of a real thing. If an abridged Shining were somehow produced for 10 year olds, this would be a fitting cover (IMO).

    Again, not trying to talk anyone out of a positive opinion they might have on this piece, just trying to shed some light on how it strikes me.
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    Senior Member Involuntarily Committed St. Troy's Avatar
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    Speaking of cartoony art, I don't expect anyone here to agree (I think it's pretty widely admired), but Jae Lee's cover (tiger leaning over a boy) for The Wind Through The Keyhole fairly screamed Bloom County at me.
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    Administrator Totally Insane Dan Hocker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by St. Troy View Post
    I may lack the vocabulary to make myself clear, but as the lone person (in this thread) that doesn't like this cover, perhaps I can explain why (and, in my case, nothing to do with not wanting to see something different; there is a lot of variety in the small/niche press world, but this is the first thing that screamed "cheap cartoon" to me):
    While there is a lot of variety in the small press world, there really isn't as much in the Stephen King small press world. At least there isn't when it comes to the artists that the "vocal" public tend to want for these books. It's usually people calling for like the same 5 or 6 artists / art styles. We're often guilty of it here at CD as well, we often will not go out of our comfort zone either.

    This piece to me is a more modern art style. I wouldn't call it cartoonish, to me it's just more of a flat geometric style of art. It actually kinda reminds me of promotional art you would see for a Wes Anderson movie.
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    Senior Member Hearing Voices Tommy's Avatar
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    I actually like the artwork just not for The Shining. It looks like it would be for a comic book version of The Shining. I'm all for changing things up but that piece never seemed right to me.

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