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    Originally posted by sholloman81 View Post
    Finally got around to watching a movie that has been on my radar forever but that I have always resisted watching for some reason, An American Werewolf in London. Really annoyed with myself as I enjoyed the heck out of this one. Definitely in the running for best Werewolf movie of all-time. Think I was put off of it by every review mentioning how much humor is in the movie as I generally do not enjoy the funny/jokey horror movies. That being said, the humor in this one was pitch perfect and very very dark. The film was also much gorier than I expected. Overall, I am very glad that I finally gave this movie a chance and will now be recommending it as one of my top Halloween watches!
    Couldn't agree more. I have a confession as well. I've never seen The Howling and I think there are several of these? Having only the Werewolf in London to go off over; it's got to be the best transformation screen from man to wolf ever done.

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      Originally posted by Brian861 View Post

      Couldn't agree more. I have a confession as well. I've never seen The Howling and I think there are several of these? Having only the Werewolf in London to go off over; it's got to be the best transformation screen from man to wolf ever done.
      I have seen The Howling, and, while I liked The Howling, I didn't love it. If I only had the chance to watch one or the other, for my money, it would be An American Werewolf in London by a landslide. Also, yeah, that transformation scene by Rick baker in An American Werewolf in London is freaking amazing. Had heard about it in the past, but, it still managed to knock my socks off. I'm a huge mark for practical effects and this one was outrageously good, probably the best werewolf transformation scene in history.

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        Originally posted by sholloman81 View Post

        I have seen The Howling, and, while I liked The Howling, I didn't love it. If I only had the chance to watch one or the other, for my money, it would be An American Werewolf in London by a landslide. Also, yeah, that transformation scene by Rick baker in An American Werewolf in London is freaking amazing. Had heard about it in the past, but, it still managed to knock my socks off. I'm a huge mark for practical effects and this one was outrageously good, probably the best werewolf transformation scene in history.
        Especially considering how old the film is now, it still holds up remarkable well. I like how it just didn't happen and the process was made to seem extremely painful. As I'm sure it would be. Like you know something bad is about to happen to your body and you have absolutely no control over it. A huge element of fear in that as well.

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          I just wrapped up a distracted viewing of a 1978 film called Magic starring Anthony Hopkins. In all honesty this film left me with a hole in my stomach.

          3.5/5 distracted stars.
          Looking for the fonting of youth.

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            The Night Eats the World.

            Watched this mildly entertaining zombie movie today. It is one of those about a guy who ends up alone during the Z apocalypse. Nothing new here and nothing added to this particular genre of movie. It was just okay.

            2.5 out of 5 stars.
            Looking for the fonting of youth.

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              CANDYMAN (2021): I'm the first to admit that I have not jumped on the Jordan Peele bandwagon. I thought that GET OUT was a smart little thriller and enjoyed it quite a bit, but thoughtUS was not nearly as clever and interesting as most reviewers thought it was. So when his name was attached as a producer, it wasn't a natural "sale" for me. His movies did have enough interesting ideas in them, that I couldn't just dismiss the new Candyman movie out of hand. Now after watching it, I wish I had.

              I loved the original CANDYMAN. It's a smart, atmospheric movie that didn't quite get the love it deserved upon release, but is now almost universally praised as one of the few great horror movies to come from the '90s. Bernard Rose took Barker's original story and crafted a scary urban legend that still speaks to the racial tensions in America without getting didactic or preachy. It was a horror movie first and foremost. It unnerved with it's hook-handed killer, but also with the poverty-and-crime-stricken Cabrini-Green and it's residents who constantly live in fear of the terrors of the real world.

              Nia Dacosta's new movie on the other hand almost forgets it's a horror movie. It absolutely wants the viewer to know that it is about something. And it almost gets there. Almost. The ideas of gentrification, police violence against African-Americans, and this same violence used as subjects of art are all touched upon and how this relates to the legend of Candyman is interesting. The problem is the movie is too interested in those ideas, about being about something that it forgets to give us reasons to care about the characters, to give the viewer something to latch onto. The movie is even confused about who the protagonist of the film is, switching POV in a manner that leaves the viewer disengaged.

              This new movie also commits the gravest of sin that a horror movie can make: it forgets to be scary. The movie lacks tension even as it ramps up the supposed horrors. In fact, the majority of the violence of happens just off-camera. I'm not a gorehound by any means, and leaving things to the imagination can be extremely effective, if shot properly. Unfortunately, that's not the case here. The scary scenes lay flaccid on the screen, bored. Even some of the line delivery in these scenes are laughable and out of step with the tone with rest of the movie ("Is this real?" One character asks as his lover bleeds out on the floor in front of him, her throat slit before his eyes.)

              There is some great ideas in this new film (and the animation sequences are outstanding), but more than anything, it just doesn't work. An interesting misfire, but a misfire nonetheless.

              Grade: D

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                Sock Monkey Thanks for the review. I wasn't overly interested in this remake as I thought the original was very good. I am also not on the Jordan Peele bandwagon. Get Out was okay but somehow lacking and I couldn't get into US.

                Fairly disinterested in most remakes to be honest.
                Looking for the fonting of youth.

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                  Originally posted by Ben Staad View Post
                  Sock Monkey Thanks for the review. I wasn't overly interested in this remake as I thought the original was very good. I am also not on the Jordan Peele bandwagon. Get Out was okay but somehow lacking and I couldn't get into US.

                  Fairly disinterested in most remakes to be honest.
                  Some remakes work, most don’t. I find the idea of most remake boring. This one is definitely more of a sequel to the original than a remake, which I did appreciate. I’m sure on paper this movie seemed like a masterpiece as the ideas are compelling. The execution just couldn’t make it work. It’s a frustrating movie to watch.

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                    I really have to catch up on movies. I too have never seen American Werewolf, and would like to rectify the situation as the previous poster did. I also need to see Get Out and Us.

                    I did recently see A Nightmare on Elm Street, the original, after having never seen it. Enjoyed it. Same goes for New Nightmare, thought that was clever (Wes Craven, and I'm sure he would not mind someone saying this and probably would agree and get a kick out of it - well, just wasn't up to par acting-wise, I'll say it like that, but of course, it didn't really matter, that wasn't the point of the film...but it was so noticeable anyway!). Saw the Freddy remake, and liked that one too; I always tend to like these remakes that are done in what I call the post-Scream manner, which has steadily evolved into the Blumhouse paradigm.

                    Also watched Saturday Night Fever and Staying Alive. Had seen Fever before of course; really cool film, a weird mixture of tones but a sustained 1970s grittiness to it. Never saw Alive. Some interesting choices there, but in the end, even though in its own weird way it's entertaining in the context of cinema history, I have to wonder how disappointed viewers of the first film were with the second. They could have done something different...perhaps have Tony coming to grips with the disco backlash, maybe fighting with his friends and others because of it, and maybe doing one last dance. The choices in the sequel really created an unexpected tone.

                    Just finished watching (yet again!) what I think is one of the best films around...Adaptation with Nicolas Cage, written by Charlie Kauffman. Have watched that many times. Always see a new nuance on each viewing. Incredibly intellectual presentation, all the way down to the fictional quote at the end of the credits taken from a fictional screenplay written by a fictional twin brother (for those who know what I am talking about).....and they say that fictional screenplay idea inspired Identity, I think. Probably didn't, probably a coincidence, but still, cool notion...

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                      I enjoyed Get Out more vs Us. Although, I thought the twist in Us was very well done. It wouldn't hurt to waste a few hours watch each film.

                      Saw Saturday Night Fever and Staying Alive when I was really young. Probably should revisit them now that I can probably truly understand what's going on lol.

                      I'll have to check out Adaptation. Don't recall ever hearing of that one. The new Nicolas Cage film looks to be really funny.

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                        Brian, I am eagerly anticipating the new Cage film coming out from Lionsgate (I want to say). In a way, it seems to be something along the lines of Adaptation in terms of intent. I have to say, that's cool that you haven't seen the latter yet...like they say, I envy someone watching it for the first time. If you end up doing so at some point, I just hope you like it...

                        I will try to see Get Out and Us at some point as well. I sort of know the basic plot of the former, and I have to see, there's one plot point in there that has me confused, so perhaps watching it will answer my question. It seems pretty scary too, probably because it is a comment on our own social reality. Hope Peele continues to surprise us with these concept-driven films (I enjoyed some of his Twilight Zone)...

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                          Here's a unique one I just finished watching, Gallery of Horror with John Carradine. It's an interesting picture, an anthology that almost is a series of stage plays. In fact, any location footage one sees is stock footage from something else. (And I have to ask: what is that famous castle you sometimes see, almost used at times as insert shots denoting scene breaks/setups - if you understand what I mean - within episodes of Gilligan's Island or Night Gallery? That seemed to be used here, and it's a castle beside an ocean, I think, sometimes with animated lightning. Must be from some other film.)

                          I guess the word on this isn't too good, but I really appreciated the atmosphere and so much wish I had discovered the movie this past October, it begs to be watched on Halloween. It's low low-budget, but I appreciated the cleverness of the presentation. Carradine sets the tales up like a lecturing professor, one who is dedicated to educating students on werewolves, vampires, and witches. The acting is bland, but not offensive (to me, anyway); it is purposefully stilted and simply a recitation of dialogue that actually is done pretty well by the actors (many will disagree with my generous assessment; maybe I was in a good mood while watching!). The episodes are short and to the point, basically no effects, any horror is economically stowed offscreen, and seriously, I appreciated the creativity of that, it must have stretched the budget, heck, even spaghettified the budget. These segments are more like vignettes, nothing plot-driven, no true characters. Sometimes it's nice to watch a movie that is not so busy, something that is simply a celebration of mood and decorum and nostalgic film stock. I want to say this was from 1967. Lon Chaney (Jr?) was in it as well, which was cool (one comment at a review site said he looked bad in it, but I didn't think that was the case; it reminded me of Chaney in another low-budget affair, Dracula vs. Frankenstein, also a great Halloween watch...I even like the song playing in the beach scene!).

                          Anyone ever see this one?...(might not be for everyone, I should add)...
                          Last edited by JJ123; 12-23-2021, 05:44 AM.

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                            Going in Style starring Morgan Freeman, Michael Caine, and Alan Arkin. This is a standard fare movie about a group of old buddies screwed over by the man and look to get even by planning a bank heist. The surprising thing is this lighthearted comedy was fun, easy to watch, and just enough cheese to be entertaining.

                            If your looking for a basic old school buddy film this one may be for you. I liked it, my wife liked it, and our two dogs -well- they slept through the whole thing. 3.5 out of 5 stars.
                            Looking for the fonting of youth.

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                              I saw Going in Style as well, a while ago. I would agree with your assessment...it was a skillfully-made, plot-driven film. I laughed at the part about the dogs - if they weren't agitated by it, one can assume they approved as well! However, I should point out I have never seen the original, and want to (with George Burns). Interestingly, seems that show Good Girls was based on this premise (have seen that series; not bad, although it went off track sometimes).

                              I sometimes try to watch classic films. This week I watched Coppola's The Conversation with Gene Hackman. It was a cool movie, but I unfortunately did not experience it in the way I should have; I found this out after reading about it after I was confused by the ending. While reading about the ending, I found out another aspect - that I missed the whole thing about the conversation itself (and by that I mean a very specific thing, not the twist itself; I got the twist, but not what generated the twist)! (I presume those who have seen the film or read about it will know what I mean; otherwise, I won't say what it is). One criticism: wish it was more a plot-driven (there's that term again) thriller than a character-driven work, although that is really more a thing of taste as opposed to a criticism.

                              Also watching a movie called Dead of Night from 1945. An anthology. One of the stories is based on a tale by H.G. Wells. Hope that turns out well in the end (so far, so good, entertaining enough, even with the dated presentation; the film looks cleaned up, though, and it implies a Twilight-Zone-type setup).....
                              Last edited by JJ123; 01-20-2022, 02:56 AM.

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