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  • Martin
    replied
    Originally posted by sholloman81 View Post
    Just finished reading Stewart O' Nan's The Night Country. Picked-up a copy of the limited from Lividian and held off reading it until now as I wanted it to be my Halloween read. Wasn't really sure what to expect as this was my first read by O'Nan. I ended up enjoying it quite a bit; though, it definitely wasn't your typical horror read. Very literary. Felt more concerned with emotion and characterization than plot (not in a bad way). If I had to describe the book, the one word that I would use the most is melancholy. This was also a very quiet story. In fact, for me, the book managed to out-quiet Charles Grant which is a feat in my estimation. And man, was the ending of the book bleak. Overall, am very glad that I was finally able to give this author a chance and look forward to my next read from him.
    You describe O'Nan's writing quite well. In my view that story is on the lower end of O'Nan. If you are a King fan you should read 'The Speed Queen'. The original title was 'Deer Stephen King' but King objected to that. 'Songs for the Missing' is an incredible story about loss and the collateral damage associated. 'The Names of the Dead' provides insight into the unseen the scars of war. He is a great writer!

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  • sholloman81
    replied
    Just finished reading Stewart O' Nan's The Night Country. Picked-up a copy of the limited from Lividian and held off reading it until now as I wanted it to be my Halloween read. Wasn't really sure what to expect as this was my first read by O'Nan. I ended up enjoying it quite a bit; though, it definitely wasn't your typical horror read. Very literary. Felt more concerned with emotion and characterization than plot (not in a bad way). If I had to describe the book, the one word that I would use the most is melancholy. This was also a very quiet story. In fact, for me, the book managed to out-quiet Charles Grant which is a feat in my estimation. And man, was the ending of the book bleak. Overall, am very glad that I was finally able to give this author a chance and look forward to my next read from him.

    Leave a comment:


  • TacomaDiver
    replied
    Back on topic - since I recently found out that AMC and Apple are working on bringing Hugh Howey's Wool to the small screen, I wanted to reread the Wool trilogy.

    I'm only about half way through the third volume of the first collection and it's going really well. I've forgotten SO MUCH about how this story goes. I'm looking forward to Silo and Dust since I remember so little about them.

    Leave a comment:


  • TacomaDiver
    replied
    Not just Oregon, but Washington too.

    The Seattle Times had an interesting article not too long ago about all of the racist language in property covenants and legal descriptions. It was eye opening to see these in black and white.

    Racist restrictions in old home deeds across Washington state will get expanded scrutiny

    Racial Restrictive Covenants

    It's sadly interesting to me to learn about how racist parts of the Pacific Northwest are still to this day.

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  • Martin
    replied
    Originally posted by c marvel View Post

    The historical quotes are about the attitude in Oregon toward anyone who was not white/caucasian. ~cap
    Oregon's past attitudes regarding Non-Caucasian people is pretty striking. They did finally remove racist language from the state constitution in 2002. I must add that 30% of the voters wanted to leave the language in place. Unfortunately, while less systemic, the issues remain as part of society here.

    Here is a short article from Oregon Public Broadcasting.
    A racist history shows why Oregon is still so white - OPB
    They also did a pretty good documentary about the subject.

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  • c marvel
    replied
    Originally posted by Martin View Post

    Not sure what part of Oregon History the book delves into but I will confirm that Oregon has some pretty dark history and you do not have to go to far back to find it.
    The historical quotes are about the attitude in Oregon toward anyone who was not white/caucasian. ~cap

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  • Martin
    replied
    Originally posted by c marvel View Post
    I haven't been here much lately, I've just been too busy. Here's what I'm reading now. Western Stories (12 stories) edited by William MacLeod Raine, it's a Dell mapback. The Lord Came At Twilight by Daniel Mills -- This book is a disappointment . The Paragon Hotel by Lyndsay Faye. when I read the Prologue to The Paragon Hotel I decided the author was too clever with words. I'm honestly really struggling with this novel. I almst set it aside permanently before page 100. I was tempted to donate this novel. The most interesting aspect of The Paragon Hotel are the historical quotes about the history of the state of Oregon. Wow! I didn't know Oregon had such an ugly history.

    Cap
    Not sure what part of Oregon History the book delves into but I will confirm that Oregon has some pretty dark history and you do not have to go to far back to find it.

    Leave a comment:


  • c marvel
    replied
    I haven't been here much lately, I've just been too busy. Here's what I'm reading now. Western Stories (12 stories) edited by William MacLeod Raine, it's a Dell mapback. The Lord Came At Twilight by Daniel Mills -- This book is a disappointment . The Paragon Hotel by Lyndsay Faye. when I read the Prologue to The Paragon Hotel I decided the author was too clever with words. I'm honestly really struggling with this novel. I almst set it aside permanently before page 100. I was tempted to donate this novel. The most interesting aspect of The Paragon Hotel are the historical quotes about the history of the state of Oregon. Wow! I didn't know Oregon had such an ugly history.

    Cap

    Leave a comment:


  • RonClinton
    replied
    Originally posted by Martin View Post

    The retelling of an event from another persons view without adding to the story did feel excessive at times.
    Yes, that was yet another issue I had with the story. A story which I just finished a few minutes ago, and without getting into spoilers, the outcome of the climax made zero sense. Along with the climax scenes being a nesting doll’s worth of coincidence worthy of an implausible soap opera, the final chapter made no sense. I can’t say more without giving things away, but surely I can’t be alone in thinking the two characters’ post-climax actions are inexplicable and without logic and reason…?

    I dig Earthling’s stuff and have enjoyed Ahlborn’s work to varying degrees in the past (BROTHER is brilliant, the other two I’ve read less so), but like the other two this one isn’t a collection keeper. Too disappointing. Off to eBay it goes, I’m surprised to say, unless someone wants to throw me an offer.

    Leave a comment:


  • Martin
    replied
    Originally posted by jeffingoff View Post

    I agree with this. Though I wasn't as quite as turned off by it as you seem to be, it does make it feel like it's a YA novel perhaps. The ending is certainly interesting and the bones of the story are typical wonderful Ahlborn. I just think it needed a heavier hand at editing. I felt like she was repeatedly making the same point and the story stalls.
    The retelling of an event from another persons view without adding to the story did feel excessive at times.

    Leave a comment:


  • jeffingoff
    replied
    Originally posted by RonClinton View Post

    You’re certainly correct and I do get that, and even understand and approve of Ahlborn’s inclusion of it as part of the story to underline their susceptibility of being ready prey…but it’s just so g’damn much…every chapter, again and again…it’s wearying and rather than make me better understand these characters that I otherwise would have zero interest in meeting in real life, the chronic droning of their selfish self-misery and petulance makes me simply not care what happens to them.
    I agree with this. Though I wasn't as quite as turned off by it as you seem to be, it does make it feel like it's a YA novel perhaps. The ending is certainly interesting and the bones of the story are typical wonderful Ahlborn. I just think it needed a heavier hand at editing. I felt like she was repeatedly making the same point and the story stalls.

    Leave a comment:


  • RonClinton
    replied
    Originally posted by Martin View Post

    That is an interesting observation. I think one of the thing that works for the story is how each person is completely self-absorbed in their problems as the family as a whole disintegrates.
    You’re certainly correct and I do get that, and even understand and approve of Ahlborn’s inclusion of it as part of the story to underline their susceptibility of being ready prey…but it’s just so g’damn much…every chapter, again and again…it’s wearying and rather than make me better understand these characters that I otherwise would have zero interest in meeting in real life, the chronic droning of their selfish self-misery and petulance makes me simply not care what happens to them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Martin
    replied
    Originally posted by RonClinton View Post
    A little over halfway through Ania Ahlborn’s new signed/limited from Earthling, DARK ACROSS THE BAY. It’s entertaining enough that I read the first half in a couple days, but the unlikability factor and repetitive self-absorbed whining of the four main characters (a family) is quite high and is making it difficult to empathize and connect with or care about their growing plight. I’ll finish the book, but not sure this a keeper for the collection.
    That is an interesting observation. I think one of the thing that works for the story is how each person is completely self-absorbed in their problems as the family as a whole disintegrates.

    Leave a comment:


  • RonClinton
    replied
    A little over halfway through Ania Ahlborn’s new signed/limited from Earthling, DARK ACROSS THE BAY. It’s entertaining enough that I read the first half in a couple days, but the unlikability factor and repetitive self-absorbed whining of the four main characters (a family) is quite high and is making it difficult to empathize and connect with or care about their growing plight. I’ll finish the book, but not sure this a keeper for the collection.

    Leave a comment:


  • Martin
    replied
    Originally posted by Martin View Post
    Nearing the end of 'The Fade' by James Cooper. Still unsure where the story is taking me but I am enjoying the journey.
    Well the journey was enjoyable as the story raised questions about what was happening without giving enough details for you to figure it out. The book concludes with a battle that raised more questions and provided no answers. Then end ruined what had been a pretty nice read.

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