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    #16
    Originally posted by RonClinton View Post
    I'd agree with the former -- that an ARC for a valuable 1st will have a comparatively higher value than an ARC for 1st w/ little to no value -- but disagree with the latter, at least based on my experience over the last few decades. There may certainly be exceptions, though, but I'd argue that they are few and far between.



    True. In fact, the entire bookcollecting market for 1sts has softened, genre and otherwise. Until recently, American fic./lit. collectible firsts had a pretty good track record, but save for a particular few renowned authors, even that market has softened to a not insignificant degree. Very unfortunate to see.
    Maybe it's just the market I work in / see mostly that the ARC's hold a higher value. Especially if the author is Stephen King.
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      #17
      Ron, as you may or may not know, I am an avid collector of Stephen King ARCs and proofs. There are a few reasons why these have such appeal to me:

      1. It's the first actual publication of an item by the publisher.
      2. I like the idea that, especially as the new ones are issued, that I'm one of a very few people in the world that is able to read it before everyone else.
      3. The relative scarcity of them makes them, to me, more desirable.

      Also, you are mistaken in your statement that the number of ARCs/proofs is undetermined. In a few cases here in the US, the publishers DO indicate how many are being produced. In the UK, Hodder & Stoughton (King's UK publisher) has started actually numbering the proofs. For example, only 77 numbered copies of Full Dark, No Stars were done. Considering that a number of these will have been used by the reviewers and discarded, the number actually available for collectors is very small.

      If you visit TheDarkTower.org, you'll see that there are a sizable number of us proof collectors, and the number is growing.

      John

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        #18
        Originally posted by jhanic View Post
        Ron, as you may or may not know, I am an avid collector of Stephen King ARCs and proofs. There are a few reasons why these have such appeal to me:

        1. It's the first actual publication of an item by the publisher.
        2. I like the idea that, especially as the new ones are issued, that I'm one of a very few people in the world that is able to read it before everyone else.
        3. The relative scarcity of them makes them, to me, more desirable.
        John, thanks for the thoughts behind the desire. I readily admit -- and, in fact, mention above -- that the points I discuss above don't apply to collectors of King and GRRM and a few select others. There is a fanatical bent to those collectors that skew the points I mention, wherein releases that might not otherwise interest generalized collectors of other authors (like ARCs, galleys, PC editions, etc.) hold great interest for the collectors of King, et al.

        Also, you are mistaken in your statement that the number of ARCs/proofs is undetermined.
        Actually, that's not what I said. What I wrote was "Along w/ the lack of unique number as mentioned above, another issue limiting the value and desirability of PC editions is that there is no telling how many PC editions are out there...could be a few, could be a lot" -- so my comments were in regards to PC editions, not ARCs.

        If you visit TheDarkTower.org, you'll see that there are a sizable number of us proof collectors, and the number is growing.
        Oh, I'm there, just w/ another user I.D, though because my interest tend to be much more broad than just King, I don't post too often. And, yes, on that point you may be correct, but I'd just fall back to my earlier point that King collectors are a fanatical group unto themselves, and the rules and trends of what's in demand and what isn't (i.e. ARCs and PC copies) that dictate the rest of the book-collecting industry largely do not apply.
        Twitter: https://twitter.com/ron_clinton

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          #19
          I'm not a fanatic. I'm not! I'm not!


          Okay, maybe a little.

          John

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            #20
            Originally posted by jhanic View Post
            Here I am, popping in!

            In general, ARCs/proofs are not worth more than the signed limited versions of the various Stephen King books (who is virtually the only author I collect), but that all depends on the book itself, the number of ARCs issued, etc. as Theli points out. There are a number of ARCs that have gone for much more than the book, however, due to their scarcity. A good example of this is the ARC/proof of King's Cell. A very few (less than 10) of this proof are in collectors' hands. To find one for less than $1000 is a good deal. But the US proof of Rose Madder goes for well under $50 (there were about 10,000 of these done.) Another example is the CD Anniversary publication of IT. Two versions of this proof exist--one the interoffice proof (red) and the "regular" proof with the Orbik cover. Because of the iconic status of the book, the interoffice proof went for $850 and the Orbik proof went for almost $500 from a recent sale at Betts books. Fewer than 12 of the interoffice proof were done, and about 20 of the Orbik one were published.

            Many of the older proofs (such as the Doubleday "long" proofs) go in the thousands of dollars. A beat-up copy of the Doubleday Stand sold on eBay recently for almost $4800. This is because they are so scarce. (I don't own any of them).

            A set of the six Green Mile proofs went for $6900 from Betts. According to my notes, fewer than 25 of proof #1 were done, and between six and ten of #6 were released. (I've heard that King wanted the proof of #6 destroyed to avoid releasing the ending. Some did get out, though.)

            When it comes to ARCs/proofs of the UK editions, much the same "rules" are in effect. Many of the more current King ARCs from Hodder & Stoughton (King's UK publisher) are numbered, starting with 2006's publication of Lisey's Story. Many of these UK proofs are issued in quantities of 250 or less.

            To see pictures of the proofs/ARCs I own, check out:

            http://www.thedarktower.org/palaver/...-jhanic-proofs

            To see the most up-to-date listing of US and UK proofs, check out:

            http://www.thedarktower.org/palaver/...en-King-Proofs

            I try to keep this listing as current as I can.

            If you have any questions, please PM me. I'll be glad to answer if I can.

            John
            Originally posted by jhanic View Post
            I'm not a fanatic. I'm not! I'm not!


            Okay, maybe a little.

            John

            Never thunk it that you were for a minute John . I think it's pretty damn cool myself your collection. Just give me the chance to mortgage my place before ya sell it off to the general public

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              #21
              Originally posted by RonClinton View Post
              John, thanks for the thoughts behind the desire. I readily admit -- and, in fact, mention above -- that the points I discuss above don't apply to collectors of King and GRRM and a few select others. There is a fanatical bent to those collectors that skew the points I mention, wherein releases that might not otherwise interest generalized collectors of other authors (like ARCs, galleys, PC editions, etc.) hold great interest for the collectors of King, et al.



              Actually, that's not what I said. What I wrote was "Along w/ the lack of unique number as mentioned above, another issue limiting the value and desirability of PC editions is that there is no telling how many PC editions are out there...could be a few, could be a lot" -- so my comments were in regards to PC editions, not ARCs.



              Oh, I'm there, just w/ another user I.D, though because my interest tend to be much more broad than just King, I don't post too often. And, yes, on that point you may be correct, but I'd just fall back to my earlier point that King collectors are a fanatical group unto themselves, and the rules and trends of what's in demand and what isn't (i.e. ARCs and PC copies) that dictate the rest of the book-collecting industry largely do not apply.
              I meant to apologize for my misunderstanding of your comment regarding PC copies. I DID read it as applying to ARCs. Sorry.

              John

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                #22
                No apologies necessary...it was an interesting back-and -forth.
                Twitter: https://twitter.com/ron_clinton

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