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njhorror
06-23-2011, 04:07 PM
I'm reading the 1980 Berkley paperback The Shapes of Midnight by Joseph Payne Brennan and introduced by Stephen King.

King really sets the mood for some good horror reading with his description of cozying up next to a fire in his rocking chair with a sixpack in western Maine while the wind coming off of the lake moans outside.

Does anyone have any memorable introductions that you would find worth mentioning?

Craig Wallwork
06-23-2011, 04:23 PM
I remember, though not very well, Stephen King writing an introduction to, i think, one of patricia cornwell's books, and slagged off another author who wrote mainstream crime novels, which was memorable but probably for the wrong reason. Maybe he slagged off Cornwell... man, this has to be the most pointless and annoying post I've comitted here. :D

If anyone does know what book it was Stephen King offended another author in the introduction, then please, let me know. :)

TerryE
06-23-2011, 06:28 PM
I don't remember it in an introduction, but God I loved the flap last year when he slammed that chick who writes the Twilight books.

Craig Wallwork
06-23-2011, 06:50 PM
Did he do it to meyer, too? Hahahaha. Oh to be as successful as he that you can publically scold the majority of the writing hacks in the world!

C.W. LaSart
06-23-2011, 09:24 PM
Pssssst! What does slagged off mean?

Nik Houser
06-24-2011, 02:31 AM
Joss Whedon wrote an introduction to a collection of comics from Marvel called The Ultimates (it was an modern, grittier version of the Avengers) in which he made reference to huge plot spoilers! WTF?!!!!! That was memorable.

peteOcha
06-24-2011, 11:43 AM
Did he do it to meyer, too? Hahahaha. Oh to be as successful as he that you can publically scold the majority of the writing hacks in the world!

Here's what he had to say about Meyer: "The real difference is that Jo Rowling is a terrific writer and Stephenie Meyer can't write worth a darn," he said. "She's not very good."

And then some more about Twilight being for girls... http://uk.eonline.com/uberblog/b82354_smackdown_of_week_stephen_king_vs.html

Took some shots at a couple of other authors as well. Go Steve! :)

Craig Wallwork
06-24-2011, 03:43 PM
Pssssst! What does slagged off mean?

Berate, Scold or criticize (someone) angrily either publicly or in private, mostly the latter depending on how two-faced you are.

And Pete - that's brillant!

C.W. LaSart
06-24-2011, 05:04 PM
Thanks :) so much slang in the world-hard to keep track!

Slee1978
06-27-2011, 07:47 PM
I liked the Twilight books. But that may just be me. I'm a Twihard

srboone
06-28-2011, 04:22 AM
E-page folder and a...Twihard?

ban, ban!!!

:p:p:p:p

jester05jk
06-28-2011, 04:38 AM
E-page folder and a...Twihard?

ban, ban!!!

:p:p:p:p

Where in the world is the "Like" button?

srboone
06-28-2011, 04:42 AM
;
Where in the world is the "Like" button?

Oh no, you too? surely you...jest. ;)

jester05jk
06-28-2011, 04:45 AM
Oh, a play on my name. Apparently I'm not the only one. I'm listening but I don't hear the drum roll anywhere.

srboone
06-28-2011, 04:51 AM
well, then, seriously, I have a question for you: What is so special about Bella? I've never read the books but have seen the movies. i can understand that a romantic triangle between a werewolf, a vampire and a human would make a great subject for a series. But you have to have them be extraordinary in some way. The movies have not done a very good job of making Bella stand out from other human friends; she is rather plain and uninteresting. So, I ask you, in all seriousnes: "Why Bella?"

jester05jk
06-28-2011, 04:54 AM
Sorry, I think we're confusing ourselves here. I meant I wasn't the only jester and my like was directed to you saying "ban" because I thought the same thing earlier before you and SK said it. I just didn't want to be that guy. I prefer not to admit that those books and movies exist, VAMPIRES DO NOT SPARKLE!!! That right there is probably my biggest hold up with even considering giving them a shot.

srboone
06-28-2011, 05:15 AM
Well, put my foot in my mouth again. Oh well.:o

And you're right, of course, they don't sparkle.:)

srboone
06-28-2011, 05:17 AM
And I did write "ban, ban" because Frik51 had used it!

Craig Wallwork
06-28-2011, 05:26 AM
I've popped in here for no other reason to say SRBOONE - love that damn quote in your signature. Harvey is one of my favourite films and for a loooong time I went under the username of Pooka. By far the best line in the film, makes me ache. :)

srboone
06-28-2011, 05:50 AM
I've popped in here for no other reason to say SRBOONE - love that damn quote in your signature. Harvey is one of my favourite films and for a loooong time I went under the username of Pooka. By far the best line in the film, makes me ache. :)

Thank Craig! great story by the by...

And I was in the process of changing my signature when I say this. Sorry!:(

Greg Lee
06-29-2011, 07:27 PM
Does anyone have any memorable introductions that you would find worth mentioning?

Harlan Ellison's introduction to Dan Simmons' collection PRAYERS TO BROKEN STONES is one of the most memorable I can remember. Also, Simmons introduction to a limited edition of I AM LEGEND by Richard Matheson was very well done. Come to think of it, another Dan Simmons introduction, this time to a trade paperback of King's CUJO was also a favorite.

Greg

C.W. LaSart
07-01-2011, 04:04 AM
I liked the Twilight books. But that may just be me. I'm a Twihard

You are entitled to like what you want ;) The reason men bash those books is because they were never a fourteen year old girl, so they can't quite get what it is aimed at. Do I think the writing of those books was good? No I don't, but I DID read them all, and so long as I kept in mind that they were aimed for the 14-yr-old girl in me, I liked them just fine. The craziness is that they are young adult books, but all these adults read and criticized them. They aren't truly meant for adults.

srboone
07-01-2011, 05:00 AM
You are entitled to like what you want ;) The reason men bash those books is because they were never a fourteen year old girl, so they can't quite get what it is aimed at. Do I think the writing of those books was good? No I don't, but I DID read them all, and so long as I kept in mind that they were aimed for the 14-yr-old girl in me, I liked them just fine. The craziness is that they are young adult books, but all these adults read and criticized them. They aren't truly meant for adults.

I bash the movies because I think they are poorly made. I've never read the books. If I found something in the movies that made me want to read the books, I would. That's why I got to these movies.

I have a feeling that in the books, Bella sees the vampire as sparkley because she is looking at them through romantic eyes, but this aspect is not very well-delineated in the movies. I also get the sense that there is something about Bella's character that makes her extraordinary in some way--something that makes a vampire and werewolf vie for her affections. The movies, however, depict her as rather plain and boring. If I could figure out makes the character of Bella extraordinary, then I would probably put them on my TBR list.

But, you're right: I was never a 14-yr-old girl, so I have to judge things as a 45-yr-old man. I'm a Dos Equis man: I'd show my feminine side, if I had one. I'm just not nearly as interesting....

C.W. LaSart
07-01-2011, 05:06 AM
I bash the movies because I think they are poorly made. I've never read the books. If I found something in the movies that made me want to read the books, I would. That's why I got to these movies.

I have a feeling that in the books, Bella sees the vampire as sparkley because she is looking at them through romantic eyes, but this aspect is not very well-delineated in the movies. I also get the sense that there is something about Bella's character that makes her extraordinary in some way--something that makes a vampire and werewolf vie for her affections. The movies, however, depict her as rather plain and boring. If I could figure out makes the character of Bella extraordinary, then I would probably put them on my TBR list.

But, you're right: I was never a 14-yr-old girl, so I have to judge things as a 45-yr-old man. I'm a Dos Equis man: I'd show my feminine side, if I had one. I'm just not nearly as interesting....

Actually, they truly do sparkle in the books (lame I know), and you find out what's special about Bella in the last book. That wasn't a man-bashing rant from me. I just feel bad for someone who is brave enough to admit they like something, and other people make fun of them as if it were a bad thing. What we prefer is opinion at best, it's nothing to rip on each other about. I do agree the movies aren't that great. Now about that Dos Equis......

srboone
07-01-2011, 05:14 AM
The beer sucks, I like thick, bitter beers myself. It was the philosophy. But if I find out what makes Bella special in the 4th (or will it be the 5th?) movie, then great. But's that's an awfully long time to wait for a revelation.

Reminds me of a Moorcock series didn't particularly like. At the end first book, ther hero and heroine joined to create a hermaphodic being that was supposed to be the next stage of evolution. But at the beginning of the second book and thru the third book, the hero was his normal self. 50 pages in to the fourth book, when someone asks him about that, he simply says, "Oh, our DNAs were ultimately incompatible."

Huh? oh well...He's still one of my favorite authors.

C.W. LaSart
07-01-2011, 05:24 AM
The beer sucks, I like thick, bitter beers myself. It was the philosophy. But if I find out what makes Bella special in the 4th (or will it be the 5th?) movie, then great. But's that's an awfully long time to wait for a revelation.

Reminds me of a Moorcock series didn't particularly like. At the end first book, ther hero and heroine joined to create a hermaphodic being that was supposed to be the next stage of evolution. But at the beginning of the second book and thru the third book, the hero was his normal self. 50 pages in to the fourth book, when someone asks him about that, he simply says, "Oh, our DNAs were ultimately incompatible."

Huh? oh well...He's still one of my favorite authors.

I don't expect you to be impressed with the final movies, nor with what makes her so special. The books and movies are extremely convenient-something that I think appeals to the target audience. That issue with the hermaphrodite would have been enough to prevent me from even finishing the second book, so kudos for making it into the fourth. I'm surprised some editor somewhere didn't shoot himself over that!

srboone
07-01-2011, 05:36 AM
I don't expect you to be impressed with the final movies, nor with what makes her so special. The books and movies are extremely convenient-something that I think appeals to the target audience. That issue with the hermaphrodite would have been enough to prevent me from even finishing the second book, so kudos for making it into the fourth. I'm surprised some editor somewhere didn't shoot himself over that!

Something crazy stupid like that fit in with the series; Moorcock as created hundreds of planes of existence (all held together by a white tower!) and they eventually start to converge (the conjuction ofthe million spheres)--much like in the DT series--so what happens in one plane doesn't neccesarily work in another. And Jerry Cornelius hops from one plane to another in the story and you have to keep a sharp eye out for when things change slightly. Confusing until you get used to it.

jester05jk
07-02-2011, 01:42 PM
You are entitled to like what you want ;) The reason men bash those books is because they were never a fourteen year old girl, so they can't quite get what it is aimed at. Do I think the writing of those books was good? No I don't, but I DID read them all, and so long as I kept in mind that they were aimed for the 14-yr-old girl in me, I liked them just fine. The craziness is that they are young adult books, but all these adults read and criticized them. They aren't truly meant for adults.

In that same aspect, Harry Potter was intended for young'uns too but almost everyone I know likes them.

MrRoland
07-03-2011, 07:58 PM
One of my favorite introductions was by John MacDonald to a Stephen King collection. In it he talks about his answer to people who make the comment that they wish they could be a writer and he says he tells he wishes he could be a brain surgeon. His point was, if you want to write, write. You can't do the same with brain surgery. He also talks about King's use of language in his stories. For me it was a memorable one.