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bsaenz24
01-31-2019, 03:30 PM
Sept 10th 2019

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1982110562/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00__o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

jeffingoff
01-31-2019, 03:43 PM
Sept 10th 2019

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1982110562/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00__o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Very cool. I skipped The Outsider, but this one interests me. Probably because IT is mentioned.

RonClinton
01-31-2019, 05:05 PM
I came away from the synopsis with two reactions:

1). It sounds like a far more entertaining, narrative/suspense-driven storyline than some of his other recent work, and 2). It sounds very familiar, like a tale I've already read several times before over the years...in varying detail, of course, but the fundamental story is the same.

Will I pick it up? Perhaps, but I'll certainly wait for the reviews first. With perhaps three or four exceptions in my decades of reading, I don't, as a rule, re-read books; life's too short. I tell ya, between recent disappointments like DR. SLEEP and SLEEPING BEAUTIES (and others which have received mixed reviews that I haven't bothered to attempt), his distastefully snide remarks on Twitter r.e. anyone who doesn't subscribe to his political perspective, and now apparently rehashing timeworn plots, King is making it pretty easy for me these days to lack enthusiasm r.e. his new releases. I adore, admire, and cherish his early classics, and post-2000 releases like JOYLAND and 11/22/63 indicate that he still has the magic from time to time, but I can't now but help approach each new release with some wariness. We'll see if THE INSTITUTE joins that very short list of recent exceptional work, or just becomes yet another listing in his lengthy bibliography that I haven't/won't read.

jeffingoff
01-31-2019, 06:48 PM
I came away from the synopsis with two reactions:

1). It sounds like a far more entertaining, narrative/suspense-driven storyline than some of his other recent work, and 2). It sounds very familiar, like a tale I've already read several times before over the years...in varying detail, of course, but the fundamental story is the same.

Will I pick it up? Perhaps, but I'll certainly wait for the reviews first. With perhaps three or four exceptions in my decades of reading, I don't, as a rule, re-read books; life's too short. I tell ya, between recent disappointments like DR. SLEEP and SLEEPING BEAUTIES (and others which have received mixed reviews that I haven't bothered to attempt), his distastefully snide remarks on Twitter r.e. anyone who doesn't subscribe to his political perspective, and now apparently rehashing timeworn plots, King is making it pretty easy for me these days to lack enthusiasm r.e. his new releases. I adore, admire, and cherish his early classics, and post-2000 releases like JOYLAND and 11/22/63 indicate that he still has the magic from time to time, but I can't now but help approach each new release with some wariness. We'll see if THE INSTITUTE joins that very short list of recent exceptional work, or just becomes yet another listing in his lengthy bibliography that I haven't/won't read.

I really liked Sleeping Beauties (obnoxious self-flagellating white-male-cis-guilt aside).

sholloman81
01-31-2019, 07:09 PM
I am really looking forward to this one as well. I too agree that the synopsis sounds familiar to other books I've read; however, that won't stop me from picking up a copy. I for one have liked most of his newer books. While they may never reach the status of some of his earlier works that we all grew up with and love, I think they are worth a read and have never regretted a purchase. I finally got around to reading his newest "Elevation" and was pleasantly surprised by how much I liked it.

Martin
01-31-2019, 07:09 PM
I will buy this day of release and be reading it shortly after I have it.

Dave1442397
01-31-2019, 09:24 PM
I just ordered a copy with the slipcase. It sounds good, and even if the subject matter has been covered a lot, you know SK's take on it will be worth reading.

c marvel
02-01-2019, 02:02 AM
I just ordered a copy with the slipcase. It sounds good, and even if the subject matter has been covered a lot, you know SK's take on it will be worth reading.

Where is the slipcase mentioned? Cap

St. Troy
02-01-2019, 03:22 AM
I really liked Sleeping Beauties (obnoxious self-flagellating white-male-cis-guilt aside).

Sounds like a skip for me.

St. Troy
02-01-2019, 03:24 AM
The Institute reminds me of Firestarter, Everything's Eventual, and Dr. Sleep - I am hopeful.

Martin
02-01-2019, 03:24 AM
Where is the slipcase mentioned? Cap

It was a CDCC offer today. I would expect it to go out the general email list soon.

c marvel
02-01-2019, 04:23 AM
It was a CDCC offer today. I would expect it to go out the general email list soon.

Yes, I saw that email once I was awake again. Then I said Doh!


Cap

Ben Staad
02-01-2019, 01:55 PM
Sounds okay but covered ground. I wonder why he didn't tie this back into The Shop? I like the page count and am a bit more interested in this then anything in the last few years.

jeffingoff
02-01-2019, 02:46 PM
Sounds like a skip for me.

Yeah it gets ridiculous in spots--all men are evil and helpless and hopeless. But I like the story. I wanted to know how it turned out. I'm very forgiving of King works. Even when he gets preachy and tries to shame me for shit I never did--and would never do. The only King book I hated and thought was a waste of my time was Revival. That's because the characters were completely undeveloped. Cardboard cutouts.

Ben Staad
02-01-2019, 03:58 PM
I loved Revival and thought it was a great story. Funny how things speak differently to the individual.


Yeah it gets ridiculous in spots--all men are evil and helpless and hopeless. But I like the story. I wanted to know how it turned out. I'm very forgiving of King works. Even when he gets preachy and tries to shame me for shit I never did--and would never do. The only King book I hated and thought was a waste of my time was Revival. That's because the characters were completely undeveloped. Cardboard cutouts.

jeffingoff
02-01-2019, 05:17 PM
I loved Revival and thought it was a great story. Funny how things speak differently to the individual.

Yeah it's all so completely subjective. Sometimes the same book can strike you a different way on a re-read. There are no wrong opinions. Unless you like Bentley Little.

St. Troy
02-01-2019, 05:48 PM
I liked Revival, and I even really liked that ending (that many didn't like).

St. Troy
02-01-2019, 06:03 PM
Sometimes the same book can strike you a different way on a re-read.

Ain't that the truth. I read many King things when I was very young (I'm 49 now) and that leaves much room for opinion shift.

Some of my opinion changes stem directly from the fact that I'm now a parent, the way I feel about certain things with children (for some reason the many child deaths in It never bothered me to read, but Tad in Cujo really did, it felt like just too much when I re-read it five years ago).

Having a bit of perspective on life definitely has an effect. The Dead Zone also looked different; still the same great story, but the sense of my God, what a waste was overwhelming upon finishing my re-read around that time.

Martin
02-01-2019, 06:07 PM
Entertainment Weekly has an excerpt and the cover for The Institute up:

https://ew.com/books/2019/02/01/stephen-king-the-institute-first-look/?utm_source=TWITTER&utm_medium=sands_social&utm_term=20190201&utm_content=2114066064&utm_campaign=Other

RonClinton
02-01-2019, 06:17 PM
Entertainment Weekly has an excerpt and the cover for The Institute up:

https://ew.com/books/2019/02/01/stephen-king-the-institute-first-look/?utm_source=TWITTER&utm_medium=sands_social&utm_term=20190201&utm_content=2114066064&utm_campaign=Other

I do like that cover...reminds me of the art that's being done for Centipede Press' WE HAVE ALWAYS LIVED IN THE CASTLE...wonder if it's the same artist?

RonClinton
02-01-2019, 06:23 PM
There are no wrong opinions. Unless you like Bentley Little.

21246

Martin
02-01-2019, 06:24 PM
And here is the UK Cover:
21247

jeffingoff
02-01-2019, 06:41 PM
Ain't that the truth. I read many King things when I was very young (I'm 49 now) and that leaves much room for opinion shift.

Some of my opinion changes stem directly from the fact that I'm now a parent, the way I feel about certain things with children (for some reason the many child deaths in It never bothered me to read, but Tad in Cujo really did, it felt like just too much when I re-read it five years ago).

Having a bit of perspective on life definitely has an effect. The Dead Zone also looked different; still the same great story, but the sense of my God, what a waste was overwhelming upon finishing my re-read around that time.

I was 14 when I read The Stand the first time. I re-read it when the uncut version came out (I was 17). But it wasn't until I re-read it as a dad when I fully appreciated a lot of the horror of the apocalypse.

BTW: I really liked the ending of Revival as well. I just thought the trip to it was not interesting enough.

jeffingoff
02-01-2019, 06:42 PM
I do like that cover...reminds me of the art that's being done for Centipede Press' WE HAVE ALWAYS LIVED IN THE CASTLE...wonder if it's the same artist?

I thought the same thing.

Brian861
02-01-2019, 07:13 PM
Picked up the slipcase, will get the book from Kim (and Simon), and listen on audio.

Jargendeli
02-02-2019, 12:50 PM
I will pick this one up the week it is released from Costco. There are very few authors on my automatic buy list. King being one of them along with Lansdale, Simon Clark and Mark Morris. Graham Masterton's horror novels also work. The rest of my current reads tend to be from the library.

I tend not to read reviews till I have finished the book. Some to avoid spoilers and I just want the story to unfold for me without any opinion to influence my take.

I understand some reviewers are very good about how they write about the book. When I was writing my reviews/column for CNN.COM I was writing them for an audience who definitely did not too many story elements revealed.

Jim

bsaenz24
02-03-2019, 08:31 PM
I haven't read a Simon Clark in a while, but I loved the ones I picked up through CD.

jeffingoff
02-03-2019, 09:41 PM
I haven't read a Simon Clark in a while, but I loved the ones I picked up through CD.

I've got RAGE MASTER. Haven't read it yet. I don't think I've read anything by him.

Martin
02-03-2019, 10:23 PM
I've got RAGE MASTER. Haven't read it yet. I don't think I've read anything by him.

Darker by Simon Clark is a very unique and enjoyable read. I also recommend his Vampyrrhic series.

bookworm 1
02-03-2019, 10:25 PM
21246

Me too!

Brian861
07-11-2019, 07:02 PM
They're at it again:

The Institute variants (http://t.e.hodder.co.uk/nl/jsp/m.jsp?c=%40aIzortAiL9rTK2kf5XM4%2Fc0s2o2gP%2Bo7dn9 9Xa6sudY%3D)

TacomaDiver
07-12-2019, 01:17 AM
They're at it again:

The Institute variants (http://t.e.hodder.co.uk/nl/jsp/m.jsp?c=%40aIzortAiL9rTK2kf5XM4%2Fc0s2o2gP%2Bo7dn9 9Xa6sudY%3D)

They're right up their IDW when it comes to excessive variants.

Brian861
07-12-2019, 08:41 AM
They're right up their IDW when it comes to excessive variants.

And I'll buy them :(

RonClinton
09-09-2019, 08:32 PM
The New York Times didn't much care for THE INSTITUTE (and, yes, I'm cherry-picking the review for the negative portion...but that negative portion essentially makes up half of the review...and, sigh, more Trump hysteria laced within King's narrative):

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/08/books/review-institute-stephen-king.html

I read “The Institute” quickly and painlessly and I tried to enjoy myself. That I didn’t is partly a matter of temperament. I generally want to smack a (fictional) kid with special powers. I don’t care about quests or magic or Vulcan mind-melding. Yet I can suspend my predispositions. The right writer can convince me to stick around. King kept me marginally on the hook.

“The Institute” buries itself under a self-generating avalanche of clichés. I began to underline them but I had to stop after a while; carpal tunnel is no joke. “Funny as a rubber crutch,” “seeya later, alligator,” “serious as a heart attack,” “none of your beeswax,” “coals to Newcastle,” “touch him with a 10-foot pole,” “not in Kansas anymore,” “go big or go home” — they’re termites, and they collapse this house before it’s even partially up. To be fair to King, he sometimes uses these half-mockingly and is partially in on the joke. But it’s hardly a good joke. Is a cliché tax feasible? At $10,000 a throw, paid to his publisher, to support rhyming poets (a suppressed minority), King could have all he wants.

The right words are all we have in this world, and King too rarely pauses to search for them. He can access a good deal of genuine chrome-wheeled magic as a writer, but he reaches too often for the canned and frozen stuff, for the dried spices, for word-clusters that fell off the back of a Sysco truck.

“The Institute” feels antiquated and a bit gamey in other ways. The novel is set in the present day, but potatoes are “spuds,” coffee is “joe,” food is “chow,” mosquitoes are “skeeters” and a doctor is “the local sawbones.” You may start to feel you’re in a ’50s-era cartoon strip, that you’re locked inside “Beetle Bailey.”

This novel is less a motorcycle than a double-decker bus, but it does handle gracefully. The plot never stalls. There’s a fervent anti-Trump streak. And King still really knows what to do when he gets his characters out on the road.

Dan Hocker
09-09-2019, 08:44 PM
“The Institute” feels antiquated and a bit gamey in other ways. The novel is set in the present day, but potatoes are “spuds,” coffee is “joe,” food is “chow,” mosquitoes are “skeeters” and a doctor is “the local sawbones.” You may start to feel you’re in a ’50s-era cartoon strip, that you’re locked inside “Beetle Bailey.”


This complaint doesn't make sense to me. This just sounds like a New York reviewer who hasn't been anywhere else who thinks everyone talks the way New Yorkers talk. I haven't read The Institute yet, but there are certainly places in the country that talk like this. Specifically small town / rural America, and SK likes to set his books in those kinds of places.

Also if I kinda feel like if someone doesn't like SK writing anti Trump / anti Republican stuff they should probably stop reading him, because I don't think he's ever gonna stop including those themes.

Ben Staad
09-09-2019, 10:12 PM
I agree with both points. As I've stated elsewhere social commentary is fine and expected but straight up bashing is when I have to set a book down.

Either way I will buy the book, read it or try to, and stick it on the shelf. Truly hope it is a great read.


This complaint doesn't make sense to me. This just sounds like a New York reviewer who hasn't been anywhere else who thinks everyone talks the way New Yorkers talk. I haven't read The Institute yet, but there are certainly places in the country that talk like this. Specifically small town / rural America, and SK likes to set his books in those kinds of places.

Also if I kinda feel like if someone doesn't like SK writing anti Trump / anti Republican stuff they should probably stop reading him, because I don't think he's ever gonna stop including those themes.

Martin
09-09-2019, 10:23 PM
I am looking forward to this one. I will be reading it by this time tomorrow!

Martin
09-11-2019, 04:07 AM
I got through the first two sections today, about 80 pages. So far I am really enjoying it. Much more classic King than his more recent work. It is nearly a 600 page book so it has lots of time to go south but so far I am pleased!

Dave1442397
09-11-2019, 12:23 PM
Read it yesterday. Loved it!

Martin
09-13-2019, 06:03 PM
The New York Times didn't much care for THE INSTITUTE (and, yes, I'm cherry-picking the review for the negative portion...but that negative portion essentially makes up half of the review...and, sigh, more Trump hysteria laced within King's narrative):

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/08/books/review-institute-stephen-king.html

I read “The Institute” quickly and painlessly and I tried to enjoy myself. That I didn’t is partly a matter of temperament. I generally want to smack a (fictional) kid with special powers. I don’t care about quests or magic or Vulcan mind-melding. Yet I can suspend my predispositions. The right writer can convince me to stick around. King kept me marginally on the hook.

“The Institute” buries itself under a self-generating avalanche of clichés. I began to underline them but I had to stop after a while; carpal tunnel is no joke. “Funny as a rubber crutch,” “seeya later, alligator,” “serious as a heart attack,” “none of your beeswax,” “coals to Newcastle,” “touch him with a 10-foot pole,” “not in Kansas anymore,” “go big or go home” — they’re termites, and they collapse this house before it’s even partially up. To be fair to King, he sometimes uses these half-mockingly and is partially in on the joke. But it’s hardly a good joke. Is a cliché tax feasible? At $10,000 a throw, paid to his publisher, to support rhyming poets (a suppressed minority), King could have all he wants.

The right words are all we have in this world, and King too rarely pauses to search for them. He can access a good deal of genuine chrome-wheeled magic as a writer, but he reaches too often for the canned and frozen stuff, for the dried spices, for word-clusters that fell off the back of a Sysco truck.

“The Institute” feels antiquated and a bit gamey in other ways. The novel is set in the present day, but potatoes are “spuds,” coffee is “joe,” food is “chow,” mosquitoes are “skeeters” and a doctor is “the local sawbones.” You may start to feel you’re in a ’50s-era cartoon strip, that you’re locked inside “Beetle Bailey.”

This novel is less a motorcycle than a double-decker bus, but it does handle gracefully. The plot never stalls. There’s a fervent anti-Trump streak. And King still really knows what to do when he gets his characters out on the road.

I am at the halfway point in the book and so far I am convinced the review quoted is for a different book. Nothing stated in the review has transpired yet. Things may change but I am really enjoying the story. A story which in no way is mentioned in the portions of the review listed here.

Brian861
09-13-2019, 07:20 PM
Are you reading or listening, Martin?

joejets
09-13-2019, 07:47 PM
They're at it again:

The Institute variants (http://t.e.hodder.co.uk/nl/jsp/m.jsp?c=%40aIzortAiL9rTK2kf5XM4%2Fc0s2o2gP%2Bo7dn9 9Xa6sudY%3D)

That link didn't work - who is selling the variants?

Martin
09-13-2019, 09:11 PM
Are you reading or listening, Martin?

A little of both. I am listening to the Audible version when driving and reading the Hardback when home. The narrator is just ok for me.

Brian861
09-14-2019, 08:27 PM
A little of both. I am listening to the Audible version when driving and reading the Hardback when home. The narrator is just ok for me.

Ugh. I'll be listening to it next. Hopefully that narrator doesn't blow for me.

JJ123
10-13-2019, 01:20 AM
What is the consensus on the book so far?

Martin
10-13-2019, 02:38 AM
What is the consensus on the book so far?

I loved it. A mix of classic and new King. For me it is his best read since at least 11/22/63.

Ranger
10-13-2019, 03:14 AM
What is the consensus on the book so far?

I thought it was mid-level King. Once again riffing off past far superior works.
The first 90 pages of the book dealing with Tim Jamieson were more interesting than the remainder of the story dealing with The Institute.
I felt like I was reading a YA novel with a bunch of plucky kids battling against the evil grown-ups.
Cartoon character villains, a complete lack of tension and the obligatory digs at the 'deplorables'.

Actually, mid-level King is being fairly generous. I thought it sucked.

Brian861
10-13-2019, 07:02 AM
What is the consensus on the book so far?

Still quite a ways to got til the finish but I'm liking it so far. A little bored at the moment so hopefully it'll pick back up soon.

I agree about Tim Jamieson being interesting. I'm sure the story gets back around to him eventually.