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HorrorScribe
06-03-2011, 12:31 PM
Like a lot of you, I'm a huge fan of the limited edition. I don't necessarily think of myself as a collector (other than of the CD Signature Series) because I read every single limited edition that I purchase. However, neither do I consider myself to be a casual reader of these finely produced books. I fall somewhere between these two categories. Perhaps I'll call myself an Admirer.

With that in mind, I've recently contemplated why limited editions exist. Well, for several reasons as we all know:

1. For true collectors
2. For horror enthusiasts
3. To bring some awesome books back into print
4. To create a special version of certain books that have become significant to horror over the years
5. To generate excitement and something of value for those lucky enough to have purchased a world's first edition of a book by a big name author in the field
6. For aesthetic purposes
7. And, damn it, because the spectacular limited edition publishers are helping to keep these extraordinary physical treasures alive; there's nothing like holding a Ray Garton limited edition novel (for example), opening up the cover to the signature sheet, and then immersing oneself in the rich prose that follows on actual pages that the reader has to flip.

I'm sure there are plenty of other reasons as well. Feel free to share your thoughts and reactions. I'm eager to learn what other people think about this topic.

Dan Hocker
06-03-2011, 02:21 PM
In my mind a small press / limited edition publisher (usually one in the same) also exist to give beginning writers a shot to get published. It is also an outlet for genre's / sub genre's that don't necessarily fit into what the mass market publishers see as "sell-able".

bsaenz24
06-03-2011, 02:42 PM
I think they also fill in the gap by publishing great authors that may not quite sell the numbers for acceptance by a large New York publishing house. This gap would include authors who write outside of the "least common denominator" kind of writing. So much of what is published by big publishing houses these days is the same story time after time and they are written, in my mind, for less discerning audience who are happy to read the "same" story over and over again under a different title. It seems like once an author has a hit with a book, those big NY publishers want them to just write the same book over and over. Very sad for the readers.

I am very grateful that specialty presses exist, not just for the quality of the production values, but because they publish different stories and hard to get authors!!! Long live the specialty presses!!!

Dave1442397
06-03-2011, 03:09 PM
In addition to the reasons above, i also like them because the quality is usually far better than a mass-produced book. The binding is better, there's a better grade of paper, etc. I have some old books from the '50s that look as if they were printed on tobacco leaves.

frik51
06-03-2011, 03:27 PM
Like a lot of you, I'm a huge fan of the limited edition. I don't necessarily think of myself as a collector (other than of the CD Signature Series) because I read every single limited edition that I purchase.

Oh, I do as well and I do consider myself a collctor. I feel limited editions should be read, not put away unopened and sold at a profit (hopefully) sometime later.
My best reading experiences have been reading my limiteds (Dark Tower!!).

sk

HorrorScribe
06-03-2011, 04:22 PM
Excellent points, all of them. And I concur that the NY publishing firms churn out drivel and derivative books. Since discovering the specialty press in 2003 (Cemetery Dance, in fact) via researching some Leisure Books authors, I've become addicted to and appreciative of the specialty press output. My ultimate goal is to someday purchase a traycased lettered edition. Talk about a worthy addition to a limited edition collection... It's come down to a matter of opportunity, money, and finding the right book by the right author.

Ben Staad
06-03-2011, 04:57 PM
Oh, I do as well and I do consider myself a collctor. I feel limited editions should be read, not put away unopened and sold at a profit (hopefully) sometime later.
My best reading experiences have been reading my limiteds (Dark Tower!!).

sk

Thumbs way up for reading limited editions! There is almost no better feeling then picking up and reading a well done limited.

RJK1981
06-03-2011, 05:22 PM
Thumbs way up for reading limited editions! There is almost no better feeling then picking up and reading a well done limited.

Agree completely. The production values are much better and it just feels much nicer holding and reading a limited edition

fleggett
06-03-2011, 09:25 PM
For me, any "limited edition" should represent the archival-quality version of any particular book, particularly if it's a lettered printing. In essence, the pinnacle of that book's presentation to the collecting public. I realize that may not sync with many here, but for me the notion seems obvious given the much higher prices demanded for limiteds versus their trade counterparts, ESPECIALLY when discussing lettered or other uber-deluxe printings.

Regarding point #2, I've never understood horror's dominance in the limited edition "scene". I think it's a shame other genres, like SF and suspense, are woefully under-represented. It seems that, whenever a small press begins their publishing endeavours, it's always geared towards horror, even though there's already fierce competition in that genre from other, more established companies. I'd personally like to see a press devoted to SF and/or fantasy much like Cemetery Dance, Gauntlet, and Bloodletting concentrate almost solely on horror titles. It would thrill me to no end if CD announced a line of non-horror fiction which would contain the same production values as their horror offerings (but I know that's not CD's bailiwick nor target audience).

frik51
06-04-2011, 04:20 AM
I've never understood horror's dominance in the limited edition "scene". I think it's a shame other genres, like SF and suspense, are woefully under-represented. I'd personally like to see a press devoted to SF and/or fantasy much like Cemetery Dance, Gauntlet, and Bloodletting concentrate almost solely on horror titles.

I totally agree. I'd love, for instance, a limited set of the Dune books, or Asimov's Foundation series - or his Robot novels.
Or Clarke's Rama books!
The possibilities are endless.

sk

Dan Hocker
06-04-2011, 05:17 AM
I think part of the problem is the Sci-Fi fantasy genre, are deemed much more "marketable" in the NY publisher's eyes, so they are not a likely to give up the rights to those books as they are a lot of the horror genre books.

Tree705
06-04-2011, 12:11 PM
I really don't see how reading your S/L's makes yo any less of a collector. I read mine, when I can. Perhaps your confusing collector with investor.

If you want to get a Lettered edition make sure you watch CD's emails. In the past they have had grab bags that have included lettered editions. You wont have a choice in what you get but it's a great way to expand your collection (or non collection) at a low price.

fleggett
06-04-2011, 03:34 PM
I really don't see how reading your S/L's makes yo any less of a collector. I read mine, when I can. Perhaps your confusing collector with investor.

It doesn't make you any less of a collector (or investor). It just makes you crazy looney-tunes insane. ;)

(j/k!)

Regarding CD's lettered editions, I've never bought a grab bag, but you're right, they do sometimes throw in letters with those. However, you might wind-up with something for which you don't particularly care. I personally take advantage of the promo codes that Mindy occasionally sends out. Some of those have been up to 50% off. There's one posted on the website right now that's a 25% off promo (I verified yesterday that it still works). I was sorely tempted to get that Gaiman book....

fleggett
06-04-2011, 03:58 PM
I totally agree. I'd love, for instance, a limited set of the Dune books, or Asimov's Foundation series - or his Robot novel.
Or Clarke's Rama books!
The possibilities are endless.

Yeah, it would be terrific if a new publisher entered the scene for the express purpose of publishing SF, fantasy, and suspense (non-horror) material. I keep waiting (and hoping). I know Centipede (God bless 'em) has published some SF, but Jerad primarily concentrates on horror. And SubPress does some SF and fantasy, but I don't buy their books for various reasons. I only learned last night that Elastic Press closed their doors in 2008 when I was researching their hardcovers (yeah, I'm behind the times).

Regarding Asimov, the late, great Phantasia Press published his Foundation/Robots series in both numbered and lettered form. Easton Press has done a quasi-limited of Dune (the first book) and Putnam has done true limiteds of some of the sequel books. Easton has also published Rama and several other Clarke titles. SF limiteds are "out there", but they're rather scattershot or their parent publishers have since gone under, driving the secondary market price through the roof (e.g., Phantasia Asimov letters aren't sold for any less than several thousand dollars).

frik51
06-04-2011, 10:00 PM
Thanks for the information.
These Phantasia lettereds sound like my next quest.

sk

fleggett
06-04-2011, 11:19 PM
Be prepared to completely demolish your bank account when pursuing Phantasia letters. I didn't know PP had even produced lettered editions until a few years ago when I was researching David Brin's Uplift series. They were never solicited to the general public and, to my knowledge, were only given or sold to authors, industry insiders, relatives, and friends. I would kill to get ahold of letters of Startide Rising and The Uplift War, but will have to "settle" for my numbered editions, as the letters are far, far too expensive for my wallet. Good luck with your search, though. Here's one to get you started:

http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?bi=0&bx=off&ds=30&pn=Phantasia&sortby=1&sts=t&tn=Robots+of+Dawn&x=53&y=8&yrh=1983&yrl=1983

$1,500 is the cheapest one there. Interestingly, Phantasia is also the publisher that produced the infamous asbestos Firestarter.

frik51
06-05-2011, 05:47 AM
Thanks for the link. Those are some of the most expensive lettered editions I've ever seen. If I woudln't have bought the lettered IT, I might have considered buying one. Not now, though.
Ah, yes, the asbestos Firestarter. Although I love limited King editions, that one has never been too high on my list. Can't really explain why not.

sk

bsaenz24
06-05-2011, 09:08 PM
Ah, yes, the asbestos Firestarter. Although I love limited King editions, that one has never been too high on my list. Can't really explain why not.

sk

Maybe it's because that whole asbestos/cancer connection is such a turn off!!!! ;)

HorrorScribe
06-07-2011, 02:35 PM
Regarding CD's lettered editions, I've never bought a grab bag, but you're right, they do sometimes throw in letters with those. However, you might wind-up with something for which you don't particularly care.

Because I'm not much a risk-taker when it comes to spending my money on unknown items, I tend to shy away from the CD grab bags as tempting as most of them are. Really, really tempting. So tempting that I agonize over purchasing one for several nights whenever they're announced. However, the next time a 50% off coupon code is offered, I'll do some serious lettered edition searching on the CD site and perhaps finally take the plunge. How refreshing and cathartic that will be!

Tree705
06-07-2011, 06:20 PM
Because I'm not much a risk-taker when it comes to spending my money on unknown items, I tend to shy away from the CD grab bags as tempting as most of them are. Really, really tempting. So tempting that I agonize over purchasing one for several nights whenever they're announced. However, the next time a 50% off coupon code is offered, I'll do some serious lettered edition searching on the CD site and perhaps finally take the plunge. How refreshing and cathartic that will be!
I think I have two lettered copies of In Laymons Terms coming (maybe one of the boys can verify this) if so I'll let you have first dibs on the extra if you like. Don't know if I would do 50% off but I could let it go for less then retail.

fleggett
06-07-2011, 10:43 PM
That's one helluvan offer, HorrorScribe. I'd grab that in a heartbeat, especially if Rich is willing to let it go for less than the MSRP.

fleggett
06-07-2011, 10:56 PM
Because I'm not much a risk-taker when it comes to spending my money on unknown items, I tend to shy away from the CD grab bags as tempting as most of them are.

In my case, I've purchased almost everything in which I'm interested. And those that I haven't purchased, but want, I'm pretty certain won't turn up in any grab bag, like a letter of Gideon's Sword, Legacies, or The Dark Tower: The Complete Concordance. And if, by some miracle, they were in a grab bag, they'd probably be PC copies, which I don't collect.

If you don't want a grab bag, but are interested in diving into the wild and wooly world of lettered collecting, I'd wait for one of Mindy's promo codes UNLESS it's a title that's going to sell out fast, like It or Full Dark, No Stars. I'm really surprised there are letters of The Mailman left (with the 25% off code, that would bring the price down to $300).

HorrorScribe
06-08-2011, 11:56 AM
I think I have two lettered copies of In Laymons Terms coming (maybe one of the boys can verify this) if so I'll let you have first dibs on the extra if you like. Don't know if I would do 50% off but I could let it go for less then retail.

That is a very generous offer, Rich. However, I don't think I can go for it right now. Got a septic system to repair, two vehicles that need to be replaced before October, etc. I do sincerely appreciate the first dibs on the extra copy, though.

***He weeps a few silent tears as he hits the "Post Quick Reply" button before he can change his mind.***

Brian James Freeman
06-08-2011, 07:59 PM
Interestingly, Phantasia is also the publisher that produced the infamous asbestos Firestarter.

Oddly enough, the gentleman who designed and printed and bound that edition now works for my printer of choice for Cemetery Dance, and I was just talking to him last week about some upcoming projects... it's a small world!

Brian

peteOcha
06-08-2011, 08:07 PM
Oddly enough, the gentleman who designed and printed and bound that edition now works for my printer of choice for Cemetery Dance, and I was just talking to him last week about some upcoming projects... it's a small world!

Brian

Nice! I sense incoming asbestos Cemetery Dance editions!

Dan Hocker
06-08-2011, 08:12 PM
Nice! I sense incoming asbestos Cemetery Dance editions!

Nah asbestos isn't toxic enough. I was thinking like arsenic laced editions..... ;)

bsaenz24
06-08-2011, 08:21 PM
Nah asbestos isn't toxic enough. I was thinking like arsenic laced editions..... ;)


Oh Dan!!! You've forgotten the first rule of publishing: Dead customers buy no books!! ;)

RJK1981
06-08-2011, 08:55 PM
Oh Dan!!! You've forgotten the first rule of publishing: Dead customers buy no books!! ;)

They could make interesting story characters in the books though ;)

pixie
06-08-2011, 09:59 PM
Like a lot of you, I'm a huge fan of the limited edition. I don't necessarily think of myself as a collector (other than of the CD Signature Series) because I read every single limited edition that I purchase. However, neither do I consider myself to be a casual reader of these finely produced books. I fall somewhere between these two categories. Perhaps I'll call myself an Admirer.

With that in mind, I've recently contemplated why limited editions exist. Well, for several reasons as we all know:

1. For true collectors
2. For horror enthusiasts
3. To bring some awesome books back into print
4. To create a special version of certain books that have become significant to horror over the years
5. To generate excitement and something of value for those lucky enough to have purchased a world's first edition of a book by a big name author in the field
6. For aesthetic purposes
7. And, damn it, because the spectacular limited edition publishers are helping to keep these extraordinary physical treasures alive; there's nothing like holding a Ray Garton limited edition novel (for example), opening up the cover to the signature sheet, and then immersing oneself in the rich prose that follows on actual pages that the reader has to flip.

I'm sure there are plenty of other reasons as well. Feel free to share your thoughts and reactions. I'm eager to learn what other people think about this topic.

I want to disagree with the statement of "for true collectors" I don't own any limited editions or lettered edtions, I can't afford them. I do own lots of gift editions. Does not owning any expensive limited editons make me less of a collector than anybody else?

folgersnyourcup
06-09-2011, 01:36 AM
I want to disagree with the statement of "for true collectors" I don't own any limited editions or lettered edtions, I can't afford them. I do own lots of gift editions. Does not owning any expensive limited editons make me less of a collector than anybody else?

I would say absolutely not.

Tree705
06-09-2011, 11:52 AM
I want to disagree with the statement of "for true collectors" I don't own any limited editions or lettered edtions, I can't afford them. I do own lots of gift editions. Does not owning any expensive limited editons make me less of a collector than anybody else?
I'm sure he didn't mean it that way.

HorrorScribe
06-21-2011, 02:54 PM
I'm sure he didn't mean it that way.

No, that wasn't my intention. For the purposes of this thread, I intended the term "true collector" to mean one who purchases limited editions in order to own and display them. Therefore, this "true collector" is but one type of person who is drawn to books, expensive or otherwise.

Long before I owned a limited edition, I considered myself to be a book collector--much to the detriment of my extremely limited storage space. For example, my mass market paperback edition of SK's Misery--which includes the romance novel mock-up cover and that I found for about $1 or so at a local used book store--is just as special to me as my $40 signed limited edition of Douglas Clegg's The Abandoned. In fact, I still consider myself to be a book collector even though I tend to purchase the least expensive version of a book whenever possible.