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Tasmaniac
03-01-2012, 03:06 AM
Looking through some old paperwork I came across my seven issues of The Official Richard Laymon Fan Club - there may have been more but we moved house and well, I kinda forgot all about it!

With the full cooperation of Richard, these 5 pages of stapled A4 kicked off the club - which was based in Scotland.

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Worthy of a mention is A Question For Laymon in which he was asked, How would you like to be remembered?

A: I'll let 'remembered' take care of itself, but it intrigues me that I am continuously invading the lives of strangers with my books. Right now, someone, somewhere is probably reading one. My thoughts, my creations, are entering that person. In a sense part of me is becoming part of that person, causing him or her to have certain physical and emotional experiences. It's strange and nice when you think about it. And mind-boggling, if you think about it too much.

peteOcha
03-01-2012, 08:46 AM
Wow, great find! Didn't even know something like this existed.

JDar.
03-01-2012, 07:22 PM
Me neither - Thanks for sharing Steve :D

Love that answer. Reminds me of Robert A Heinlein's STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND . . . except this provides food for thought . . . :cool:

Jan

bookworm 1
03-02-2012, 02:03 AM
Makes me sad that he is gone:(.Thanks for sharing that.

Tasmaniac
03-02-2012, 03:41 AM
No problem in sharing these!

Makes me sad too, bookworm 1. I remember feeling totally stunned when I heard the news of his passing. I never met the man, never spoke through e-mail, just loved his books.

What I'll do is post the covers of each issue I have, along with questions put to Richard - if only to read a little more of what this great author had once said.

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Q: Do you ever give yourself the jitters when you're writing?

A: Sometimes, I give myself the jitters when writing. It's fairly uncommon, though. For one thing, I do all my writing during daylight hours. (It might be fun to write a book at night, sometime, and see what happens. I easily get the creeps late at night, if I'm awake when my wife and daughter are asleep.)
Though I get deeply into whatever I'm writing about - strongly feeling what the characters feel - there is also a separation. While part of my mind is in the situation, another part is observing, watching from a distance, judging, making decisions about which words to use, what to have happen next, etc. The observer in me doesn't get the jitters. More often than not, when something really BAD is happening, he's giggling with delight and thinking "Oh, wow! This'll get 'em!"
So, while I am living my stories, I am also partly standing back and pulling the strings - the Master of Games.

Tasmaniac
03-03-2012, 11:44 PM
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Q: Who are your favourite 'Horror' authors?

A: I've been impressed and influenced by such early authors (aside from Chaucer, Shakespeare, etc) as Poe, Hawthorne, Bram Stoker, Wilkie Collins, Charles Dickens, M.R. James, Algernon Blackwood, and H.P. Lovecraft. A special favourite of mine is William Hope Hodgson, who wrote astonishingly creepy tales - mostly about the sea.
Other guys who wrote neat, creepy stuff were Seabury Quinn (a WEIRD TALES contributor), and Davis Grubb (famous for his novel NIGHT OF THE HUNTER).
As a teenager, I read everything I could find by Robert Bloch and Richard Matheson. I was also a fan of Ray Russell and Roald Dahl.
Ira Levin has written several excellent horror novels and thrillers. He can always be counted on for a story that's unusual, creepy, well written and memorable.
Stephen King? I thought SALEM'S LOT was just about the best, creepiest book I have ever read. And it was partly the inspiration for THE CELLAR. I'd been working on violent suspense thrillers before reading SALEM'S LOT. After being so impressed by King's vampire book, however, I decided to write something spooky. And I've been doing that, pretty much, ever since.
Of course, I am a big fan of Dean Koontz. He is also a very close friend. Since meeting him in about 1980, I have read everything he has written, and I always look forward to a new book of his coming out. (He has written the introduction for my story collection, FIENDS, which Headline will be publishing in January, 1997). Though I like all his books, a few of my real favourites are STRANGERS, ODDKINS, and TWILIGHT EYES.
Some of my other favourite current American writers are Jack Ketchum, F. Paul Wilson, Bentley Little, Ed Gorman, and Michael Cadnum.
A big favourite of mine is the Canadian author, Michael Slade. He is actually a couple of guys, apparently. Slade's books are violent, original, very well written, wonderful. I always grab the new one the moment I see it.
Of current British horror writers, I am a great fan of James Herbert. His book, SURVIVOR, is one of the creepiest books I've ever read. THE FOG is ever spookier. I actually had to stop reading THE FOG one night because it was creeping me out too much. (Of course, I resumed reading it the next day) I don't think anybody does it better than James Herbert.
Other British favourites of mine are Simon Ian Childer and Harry Adam Knight. I understand that they are the same person, or writing team. Their stuff reminds me of monster movies from the 1950's...but better. I'm also a fan of Shawn Hutson, Stephen Gallacher, and a fairly new writer named Simon Clark, whose stuff is very creepy.
I am, of course, leaving out a lot of writers whose work I really enjoy, but it'd take too much space to name them all. Those mentioned above are a fairly good sampling, though, of my favourites.
Generally speaking, I read 50-60 books per year. They Include bestsellers, mysteries, classics and horror. And a few non-fiction books, usually about crime or politics.

srboone
03-04-2012, 04:34 AM
REally diggin' these posts, Steve. Thanks for shring.

Tasmaniac
03-04-2012, 05:07 AM
REally diggin' these posts, Steve. Thanks for shring.

Cheers, Squire!

I was hoping others here may have joined up as I wanted to know how many issues they indeed put out.

srboone
03-04-2012, 05:41 AM
Hell, I never read Laymon (or many of these authors other than King, and Matheson) until 2010!

Martin
03-04-2012, 05:45 AM
Discovered Laymon in 1999 but did not know of the existence of the fan club. Thanks for sharing these.

srboone
03-04-2012, 06:18 AM
The funny thing is that the first Laymon book I read was CD's The Woods Are Dark; then I found an 80's paperback of The Cellar tucked away on my bookshelves. So I'd heard of Laymon when I was in high school cause I'd obviously thought about reading him, but never did....:rolleyes:

Tasmaniac
03-04-2012, 11:08 PM
The funny thing is that the first Laymon book I read was CD's The Woods Are Dark; then I found an 80's paperback of The Cellar tucked away on my bookshelves. So I'd heard of Laymon when I was in high school cause I'd obviously thought about reading him, but never did....:rolleyes:

80's p/b of THE CELLAR? Was this the one?

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I picked this up years ago because of the cool inscription.

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srboone
03-05-2012, 03:41 AM
Yep. It wasn't signed, tho.

Grant Wootton
03-05-2012, 04:04 AM
Very nice Tas - you certainly pulled that particular rabbit out of your hat !!! Well done !!!! :cool:

srboone
03-05-2012, 04:27 AM
Mine was in a box of books I bought at a garage sale in 1984. So I honestly can't even say i intended to read it, I guess.

bookworm 1
03-05-2012, 03:06 PM
Ahh.Got to love those garage sale finds.When I was younger as in high school that was a great way to get great books.I think that is why I love the book store in our library.Last week I picked up a Lymon book.darkness Tells Us.I have found Grant,Bloch,and Lansdale.I really like these posts.I did not know there was a fan club either.My 2 favorite books by Lymon are Savage so different from his other stuff.And Traveling Vampire Show.That book has Bradbury influence all over it.

Martin
03-05-2012, 03:09 PM
Traveling Vampire Show was my first, and is still my, favorite Laymon novel.
Ahh.Got to love those garage sale finds.When I was younger as in high school that was a great way to get great books.I think that is why I love the book store in our library.Last week I picked up a Lymon book.darkness Tells Us.I have found Grant,Bloch,and Lansdale.I really like these posts.I did not know there was a fan club either.My 2 favorite books by Lymon are Savage so different from his other stuff.And Traveling Vampire Show.That book has Bradbury influence all over it.

Tasmaniac
03-05-2012, 10:53 PM
Very nice Tas - you certainly pulled that particular rabbit out of your hat !!! Well done !!!! :cool:

Ha! I don't have much of a collection these days but there are a few things I just couldn't part with, namely a Beast Wishes from R Laymon.

Tasmaniac
03-05-2012, 11:01 PM
Traveling Vampire Show was my first, and is still my, favorite Laymon novel.

SAVAGE was my first Laymon novel, which hooked me into reading his others. If I were to choose a favourite, ENDLESS NIGHT.

Tasmaniac
03-05-2012, 11:21 PM
Hmm, I can't seem to find issue #4 - so here's a question put to Richard from issue #2 that I skipped.

Q: Are any of your characters based on people you've met?
A: Some of my characters are based on people I know. The character most closely based on a real person is Pete in THE STAKE. Though the events of the book are mostly fiction, Pete looks and acts very much like my friend Frank De Laratta. Also, Larry Dunbar is based fairly close to me. This caused me some embarrassment because the wives of Pete and Larry in THE STAKE are not at all like our real-life wives. I had to keep blurting out to Frank's wife, "It's fiction! It's fiction!"
A character in BEAST HOUSE, Gorman Hardy, was a very sleazy operator, a real jerk. I modelled him after my first literary agent, who is now deceased. Oddly enough, I'd never heard of the name Gorman at the time I created Gorman Hardy. I later got to know Ed Gorman, a fine fellow and terrific writer, and we now have become very good friends.
I modelled Jody Fargo's father, in ENDLESS NIGHT, after Los Angeles police sgt. Stacey Koon, who was imprisoned for using force to subdue a felon who was resisting arrest.
For the most part, however, my characters aren't based closely on any real people. They're mixtures of this and that from various people.
I do sometimes use the name of a real person. In some of my books, I have given nasty characters the names of actual people I'd had problems with. It's a sneaky, secret way of getting revenge in my own mind. On other occasions, I've named characters as a tribute to people I admire. An example of that is Neal Darden, the protagonist of BODY RIDES. I gave him the Darden name as my "private" tribute to Christopher Darden, who was the prosecutor in the O.J. Simpson case. I was greatly moved by Chris Darden's courage and honesty.

Tasmaniac
03-06-2012, 11:23 PM
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I'm struggling to find anything worthy of posting in this issue as Richard had recently broken his arm, thus no question.

Dave1442397
03-07-2012, 11:10 AM
These are great! I have almost every Laymon book, apart from a couple of rare collectibles that I may never bother with, as the stories they contain are already included in some of his other books.

I knew I had a lot of his books, so a few months ago I dug through the shelves and made a list of what I had, then started looking for the rest. I still have a pile of them I haven't read yet, but I try to read one every couple of weeks.

Menace
03-07-2012, 01:14 PM
I am sad to say I only discovered Richard Laymon 2 years ago. But am making up for lost time. Picked up the book One Rainy Night in a used book store 2 years ago read that and went back to the used book store and bought every Layman book I could find. I now have about 25 of them and have read probably 20 of them. He came very close to taking Stephen Kings place as my favorite author. I was sad to have found out he had passed away and there would be no more new books from him.

Tree705
03-07-2012, 04:02 PM
Very cool. I'm sure a Laymon completest would offer you a nice little chunk of change for those.

JDar.
03-07-2012, 04:31 PM
I am sad to say I only discovered Richard Laymon 2 years ago. But am making up for lost time. Picked up the book One Rainy Night in a used book store 2 years ago read that and went back to the used book store and bought every Layman book I could find. I now have about 25 of them and have read probably 20 of them. He came very close to taking Stephen Kings place as my favorite author. I was sad to have found out he had passed away and there would be no more new books from him.

I did the same thing in the summer of 2001. I really did think he was Stephen King writing some of his best work. (yes, I was ignorant :rolleyes: )

Good news for you is you can track down at least another 40 books, including 20 Fastback mini-chapbooks to continue his fine catalog.

http://www.zianet.com/rsace/laymon2.html

Jan

Tasmaniac
03-07-2012, 09:31 PM
These are great! I have almost every Laymon book, apart from a couple of rare collectibles that I may never bother with, as the stories they contain are already included in some of his other books.

I knew I had a lot of his books, so a few months ago I dug through the shelves and made a list of what I had, then started looking for the rest. I still have a pile of them I haven't read yet, but I try to read one every couple of weeks.

After I read SAVAGE I just had to grab more of his work. Luckily, Laymon was pretty widely stocked in the (UK) bookstores I used so picking up his back catalog was never a problem.

Tasmaniac
03-07-2012, 09:35 PM
I am sad to say I only discovered Richard Laymon 2 years ago. But am making up for lost time. Picked up the book One Rainy Night in a used book store 2 years ago read that and went back to the used book store and bought every Layman book I could find. I now have about 25 of them and have read probably 20 of them. He came very close to taking Stephen Kings place as my favorite author. I was sad to have found out he had passed away and there would be no more new books from him.

It's great to see readers discovering Laymon! I remember the buzz of having picked up a fresh couple of books, and tucking into one on the bus ride home (just because I couldn't wait!).

Tasmaniac
03-07-2012, 09:41 PM
Very cool. I'm sure a Laymon completest would offer you a nice little chunk of change for those.

Hey Rich! It's been a while! Hope the eye operations were a success.

Contacted Steve Gerlach a couple of days ago (as his website, RLK was advertised in issue #5) and asked if he knew how many issues they actually put out. He has them buried in paperwork somewhere but remembers there were only a few done, so maybe it was just the seven. If only I could find #4!

JDar.
03-07-2012, 09:49 PM
After I read SAVAGE I just had to grab more of his work. Luckily, Laymon was pretty widely stocked in the (UK) bookstores I used so picking up his back catalog was never a problem.

My first was TRAVELING VAMPIRE SHOW (thank you Leisure) Leisure hadn't announced that they were going to reissue his books, so I just had to grab a dozen of his books from a UK bookstore . . . book prices were great, but boy did they rip me off with the shipping costs. (still worth it to have these high-quality Headline PBs :cool: )

Tasmaniac
03-07-2012, 10:52 PM
My first was TRAVELING VAMPIRE SHOW (thank you Leisure) Leisure hadn't announced that they were going to reissue his books, so I just had to grab a dozen of his books from a UK bookstore . . . book prices were great, but boy did they rip me off with the shipping costs. (still worth it to have these high-quality Headline PBs :cool: )

Loved the Headline (Steve Crisp) covers too!

Tasmaniac
03-07-2012, 11:10 PM
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A lot of reader's articles cover the majority of the issue. In Laymon News: Mr. Laymon's arm has now mended! Apparently, his better half had painted the front steps, couple with some morning dew, and voila! One tossed Laymon.

Word search for all the puzzlers out there!

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Tasmaniac
03-09-2012, 12:07 AM
Okay, here's the last issue I have!

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The majority of the issue is filled with interviews.

Laymon News
Headline radically change Richard Laymon's paperback cover layout and design. The new covers begin with Fiends and will continue thereafter.
Richard's next book will be about his scariest character - Himself! He is writing an autobiography as yet untitled.
Latest edition of US magazine Cemetery Dance contains a big interview with Richard and an original story called Herman.
Another original story First Date has just been published in the anthology, Love in Vein II.

LAYMON ON LAYMON: Experimental Fiction

Here's a biographical aside in connection with Island, and other novels I've done.
When I was going for my B.A. degree in English at Willamette University, I needed to pass "oral exams" given to me by various members of the English department.
It was common knowledge that I hoped to be a writer: I'd submitted material to the Willamette literary magazine, and one year won a short story contest.
At the time of my orals, one of the professors asked me, "Do you ever plan to write 'experimental' fiction?"
"No" said I.
To me, "experimental" translated as "deep, ponderous, plotless, generally senseless, incomprehensible."
The sort of fiction with which I wanted nothing to do.
In the past few years, however, I've often wished I could go back in time and revise my answer.
Because, in a sense, all fiction is experimental. Every new book is an adventure into unknown territory. As Hemingway told us, you (the writer) have to go out beyond where you have gone before.
If a writer isn't simply re-hashing the same story again and again, he is constantly experimenting with new plots, new types of characters, settings and themes, etc.
Recently, I've found myself especially drawn to fooling around with techniques for telling my stories.
Savage, for example, is a first-person narrative written by its main character, Trevor Bentley, years after the events of the story. Trevor, raised to the age of fourteen in London, recounts his tale in a language that is an odd mixture of British and old western slang. He sounds a bit like a cross between Dr. Watson and Huck Finn. His language gives the book a very unusual flavor, I think. Savage is probably the only book ever written in such a style.
In Endless Night I had the main villain, Simon, tell his own story in a series of tape recordings. By using these recordings, I was able to show Simon's side of the story -- or whatever he wanted us to know about him. I was also able to use his voice. He took great delight in doing and saying the most awful things imaginable. I put some attitudes into his mouth that I, myself, would never dare to express in print.
In preparing the contents of Simon's recordings, I discovered great differences between written and spoken language. After noticing this, I read all the tape material aloud and did major revisions in the rhythm, phrasing and diction in order to make Simon's monologues sound as if they'd been spoken, not written.
The tape recordings in Endless Night led to the journal in Island. In the case of Island, however, the voice belongs to my protagonist, not my villain. Rupert not only tells what is happening on the island, from his own persective, but the journal format gives us a chance to study his character. He reveals more about himself, perhaps, than he wishes.
What attracted me most about the journal format for Island, however, was the was the notion that my castaway was describing events as they happened -- or shortly afterward. The story is on-going, even as it is being penned. Nobody, not even the narrator, knows what might happen next.
Because of the journal technique, readers have no way of knowing, until the very end, whether the writer of the tale survives.
My work-in-progress is the most experimental of all. But now is not the time to tell about it.
I just wish I could have another crack at answering that question put to me by my professor at Willamette all those years ago.
"Do you plan to write experimental fiction?" she would ask.
And I would answer, "All depends on what you mean by experimental."

srboone
03-09-2012, 01:27 AM
Awesome, Steve. just awesome! Thanks for sharing all this stuff.

bookworm 1
03-09-2012, 10:26 PM
I really love this thread.I wish you had more stuff to share.Lymon was such a talent.

Tasmaniac
03-10-2012, 09:02 PM
Awesome, Steve. just awesome! Thanks for sharing all this stuff.

No problem, Squire! Glad you enjoyed it.

Tasmaniac
03-10-2012, 09:03 PM
I really love this thread.I wish you had more stuff to share.Lymon was such a talent.

Me too, bookworm 1!

peteOcha
03-16-2012, 11:56 PM
Thanks for sharing! This has made me want to hunt for some Laymon hardcovers! :)

Tasmaniac
03-21-2012, 02:36 AM
Thanks for sharing! This has made me want to hunt for some Laymon hardcovers! :)

Yeah, a shelf of UK Headline H/C's would be wonderful!

JDar.
04-19-2012, 05:59 PM
Don't recognize the seller, but this should be fun watching (Carla Laymon's A STRANGER'S ARMS)

http://www.ebay.com/itm/370605536375?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649

Jan

frik51
04-19-2012, 06:43 PM
I've never read anything by Laymon.
Any recommendations?

sk

bsaenz24
04-19-2012, 06:44 PM
I've read Traveling Vampire Show and really enjoyed it.

Xiabei
04-19-2012, 07:34 PM
I loved "In The Dark". It was my first Laymon book. Picked up a lot after that, but some of his earlier stuff that was republished didn't do much for me. I'll always love the Beast House stuff though.

Martin
04-23-2012, 04:35 PM
Traveling Vampire show is my favorite Laymon book.
I've never read anything by Laymon.
Any recommendations?

sk

SpaceAvenger
07-13-2012, 05:14 PM
Yes Tasmaniac - I too was a member of the RLFC (based in Scotland). I had all the issues as well until my membership lapsed some time in 1997. Not sure what became of the club!